Orlando music blog

A Crying Libra Against The World

I’ve been so lucky to watch Alexia Clarke grow creatively. Since starting fem zine Phosphene Girl in December 2015, she’s repeatedly poured her feelings onto paper, whether they be about body image, race, self-acceptance, or relationships. This Friday, bae will be hosting Combination 5 as a part of ORL dance-curators, TMD. Happy Valentine’s Day everybody.


Orlando music blog

matthew warhol: So … I don’t really know what to ask you, because I know you so well. So, how are you involved with the TMD event?

Alexia Clarke: I’ll be hosting TMD Combo 5 this Friday. This event is different because they’re trying to kind of expand their community and the people who attend it. TMD for so long was just like, straight white guys, so now we’re finally incorporating in a female DJ who is also a person of color and all the proceeds we make are going to Planned Parenthood.

matthew warhol: And Alana is involved, too.

Alexia Clarke: Mhm! Alana’s going to be selling zines and art and I will also be selling zines!

matthew warhol: Are you nervous because you’ve never hosted anything before? Do you know what you’re going to say?

Alexia Clarke: I’m really excited because I’m good at things like that.

matthew warhol: Like what?

Alexia Clarke: Like, getting up to a mic and saying whatever I feel like. I like the power in it, also.

Orlando music blog

matthew warhol: What are you going to say?

Alexia Clarke: I don’t know. I think i’m going to plug my friends a lot. Make it known that this show is different, and we’re kind of taking it over.

matthew warhol: What do you think the importance of it is?

Alexia Clarke: I think it’s important for everyone to feel like they’re included for once. I think it’s important, because like when I go to events and I don’t see other people that look like me — like other girls of color or just black people in general, it sucks. I feel like this event is the beginning of seeing other parts of Orlando and other parts of this giant scene that has only belonged to this one specific demographic. It’s just the fact that we need the right people. And I think that’s why I’m really into being included. Like yes, I am this person of color, and yes, I am incorporated in this scene, but I still don’t really feel like a part of it in some way. This event is kind of my way of saying, “I’m here! I’m doing this! I can’t be ignored!”

matthew warhol: When was the first time you were more than just a bystander in the Orlando art scene?

Alexia Clarke: When I did spoken word. For once in my life, I felt like I was being heard and people are finally understanding the way I feel. After that, I got involved with Tittie Thyme. We put together an event to showcase women, called Ladies Get Lit. I put out my first zine then.

matthew warhol: What made you want to do it in the first place?

Alexia Clarke: I was really sad. And I  just needed a positive and productive way to put my time.

Orlando music blog

matthew warhol: Why were you sad?

Alexia Clarke: I don’t wanna talk about it. [smiles]

matthew warhol: But, you’re not sad about that anymore? So why did you continue making zines?

Alexia Clarke: I think because Phosphene Girl has always been a safe haven for me in the last two years. And even if I don’t feel sad, it’s a way for me to put all of these thoughts that I’ve had into one cohesive book. It’s kind of like a yearbook for me, I can like look through them and just be instantly transformed back into that time where I felt exactly like that. And it’s cool because those are the important things that I need to remember, you know? Like when I felt like the lowest of the lows, and when I didn’t like my body or thought no one loved me. I think it’s really important.

matthew warhol: What are the themes that you explore in your zines?

Alexia Clarke: Most of the topics I cover are about me coming to terms with my body, um, basic relationship things, uncertainty, my attitude, and my own personal vendettas.

matthew warhol: Do you ever go back and look at them?

Alexia Clarke: Yeah, always.

Orlando music blog

matthew warhol: What do you feel when you do that?

Alexia Clarke: I feel good because I don’t really feel the ways that I did when I was writing those things. I feel like I grew from it. I feel like that’s why people write in the first place. I like that it just stays on the page because I don’t want to hold on to it anymore. I just want other people to see it and relate to it, and that’s it.

matthew warhol: How far apart were the zines?

Alexia Clarke: All of them are six months apart.

matthew warhol: You’ve obviously matured as like a writer since you’ve started. Can you tell the difference?

Alexia Clarke: Of course! It was so hard to find things for the third one because I wasn’t as sad. And that kind of made me disappointed in myself. I didn’t know how exactly it would work out. Because that was my thing, you know? Sad girl work. From the first one to the second one — because the first one wasn’t me — Phosphene Girl was transformed into I diary for myself.

matthew warhol: So the second one you think is also sad?

Alexia Clarke: Yeah, the second one is a year’s worth of work put together.

Orlando music blog

matthew warhol: There’s stuff about when we weren’t together?

Alexia Clarke: Yeah, there’s a poem in there that is from when we were together the first time.

matthew warhol: Oh …

Alexia Clarke: Yeah, the one about me eating.

matthew warhol: So what do you think the next one will be about? Do you think it’ll be another six months?

Alexia Clarke: I like the idea of them coming out every spring and winter. And I want it to be more light-hearted, but I’ve never been like that. I think I’ve always been seen as this light-hearted person, but anyone who really knows me knows I’m not.

matthew warhol: You just take it as the feelings come to you. When I see you work on stuff, it’s in the moment.

Alexia Clarke: Exactly, everything is in my notes, my notebook. When I sit down to put the zine together, it’s me looking through my tumblr, my twitter, my notes.

Orlando music blog

matthew warhol: Is it more difficult when you try to do it after the fact, after the feelings have passed? 

Alexia Clarke: Yeah, it’s way harder. I’m the same way as you; I only think of the bad things when the bad things are happening. When I’m happy it’s so hard to create work. I don’t like being that type of artist, but it’s when the best work comes out.

matthew warhol: I want to go back to the Orlando art scene for a second. Do you personally feel included in it?

Alexia Clarke: I feel like I’ve never really felt completely comfortable in wherever I am. I feel like I’m always the token, or this or that. Even though we have amazing friends who understand who I am, I’m still never going to be completely comfortable within my own community — until we get to the point where we can completely merge.

matthew warhol: Where do you feel most accepted?

Alexia Clarke: I think like Harry or Harryson, anything that they throw, because those two are the most well-rounded people who can reach every kind of person. Wherever you go that they are, it’s like this is where everyone should be, because this is the perfect amount of different people. So I would say Talk Yo Shit, definitely. Anything by Retro Neon. Anything B8TA.

Orlando music blog

matthew warhol: And how do you think people can make their events more inclusive?

Alexia Clarke: I think just having more people of color. Have them show their art. Make sure you’re paying them for their art. Make sure they’re there and they’re present. That’s the first way to make people comfortable.

matthew warhol: Representation.

Alexia Clarke: Exactly, if their friends are there, they’re going to go.

matthew warhol: What else? Should we talk about us?

Alexia Clarke: Uh, I don’t know what we should say.

matthew warhol: Oh, what about the zines we’ve done together?

Alexia Clarke: Oh yeah, our color zines! We’ve done Red, Orange, and Yellow so far. We’re doing Green soon. We planned out the next few on a plane ride to Arizona. And yeah, it’s really fun.

matthew warhol: I’m really happy with the reception to it. It’s been like super organic.

Alexia Clarke: It’s been super easy. I think we’re just really good at thinking of weird things that work together. Because we pay such close attention to detail. And it’s getting more intricate, like how we put the word search in Yellow.

matthew warhol: It’s just fun. And it’s so quick that it doesn’t get daunting.

Alexia Clarke: And it’s just another excuse to do something together.

matthew warhol: Aw. Okay… I love you.

Alexia Clarke: I love you too.

matthew warhol: Happy Valentine’s Day. 🙂

Orlando music blog

SugarPlum Orlando music
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A Sweet Treat w/ SugarPlum

I became aware of Chelsea Ybarra after my friend Henderson Nguyen sent me the music video he had just finished for a song called “All The Time.” The video featured a new ORL artist who went by the name SugarPlum. The visuals were bright and SugarPlum was bubbly; her voice joyfully sung the sweeeet chorus. After meeting her a few times and seeing her first two live performances, at Will’s Pub and Spacebar respectively, I became more interested in uncovering who this SugarPlum really was. So we scheduled an interview in Stardust Video & Coffee to talk about her upcoming, currently-untitled EP. Our talk even led to a visit to the ice cream parlor where “All The Time” was filmed. Enjoy.

Upcoming Appearances: February 10 @ Will’s Pub w/ Zoya Zafar & Pathos, Pathos.


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matthew warhol: I wanted to ask you, straight off, who exactly is SugarPlum? Is she, you? Is it kind of like a morphed version of you? How do you see it?

SugarPlum: … it’s kind funny how SugarPlum started. Ever since I was little I wanted to do the music thing, but I was never like, ballsy enough to do it. I needed that push. And my best friend Sarah — who’ve I’ve been best friends with since we were three-years-old, she does all my cover art — she always had my name in her phone as SugarPlum. So I was said that if I ever made music, I would use SugarPlum. [She’s] kind of like the girl who could. And I always said SugarPlum could be so much more than music. But essentially I am SugarPlum.

matthew warhol: So aesthetically, what is that? What is the vibe around SugarPlum?

SugarPlum: She’s like the goofy side of me, I think. The one who’s cheery and happy all the time. And even when things are hard she’s like, “Whatever, let’s go out!” I think she’s the version of me that pushes me to do all the things that are out of my comfort zone. Maybe I can’t do it but SugarPlum can.

SugarPlum Orlando music

matthew warhol: When did she start to take shape?

SugarPlum: It [happened] after I met Henderson. He was a fan before I even met him. I would post little videos of me playing guitar and singing on Instagram. And he would randomly comment on them saying, oh this is good. And when I finally played for him, he instantly shed into tears and was like, “No, you have to do it!”

matthew warhol: Was Instagram the first platform you started putting your stuff on?

SugarPlum: Yes.

matthew warhol: And when did that start?

SugarPlum: That was my first semester of college, so roughly a year ago. So like the end of 2015, I started posting videos of me playing.

matthew warhol: Were you playing your own songs?

SugarPlum: No, I was just doing little covers. I was too scared to post my songs. And I was obsessed with Frankie Cosmos at the time. I would go to my friend’s house, who had all these instruments and a studio, and record myself playing all of her songs — the guitar, the main and backing vocals, the whole thing. I was trying to get a feel of what it was going to be like to record songs. And then randomly I met my friend Alex, and he was super about recording.

SugarPlum Orlando music

matthew warhol: Your first song, “All The Time,” was that recorded with Alex?

SugarPlum: Yes.

matthew warhol: There are drums on that song. Who did those?

SugarPlum: Those were all done on the computer. I’ve been looking for a drummer for the longest time. They’re like hiding from me!

matthew warhol: Maybe you’ll be able to find one through this interview.

SugarPlum: Scouting drummers!! I really am looking!

[laughs]

SugarPlum Orlando music

SugarPlum Orlando music

matthew warhol: With “All The Time,” a lot of the lyrics seem very direct. They sound like we’re hearing actual experiences. Is that the case?

SugarPlum: Yeah, yeah! 100% real. I think the moment I started “All The Time,” I already knew what I wanted it to be. The writing process for me is like … I can write a verse in seconds, but the chorus is what gets me — the repetitiveness, writing something catchy. But “All The Time” like basically wrote itself. It was about the scenario when you’re with someone and you end it. And they keep calling you. And you like that they keep calling you. It’s that good feeling that they still want you, but you have so much you have to do.

matthew warhol: And even the chorus came together quickly?

SugarPlum: It was super fast. I was honestly just rushing it because I wanted to get it out! I knew my first song wasn’t going to be my best song, so like I’m not going to over think it. But then it like, blew up and I was like *screams*.

matthew warhol: Where was that reception coming from?

SugarPlum: I was always random people who always wanted me to do it and were waiting for me to do it. One of those people, who I appreciate and admire a lot, is Scott. He runs a music blog, 53rd & 3rd. And Sarah, who I mentioned earlier, worked with him at Barnes n Noble. She showed him “All The Time” when it came out. And he wanted to meet me and post the song. From there one of those blogs that automatically reblogs songs it sees potential in reblogged it.

matthew warhol: Was it Hype Machine?

SugarPlum: Yeah!

matthew warhol: Really? That’s really good!

SugarPlum: I was like “WOW!” I didn’t know what that meant at the time.

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matthew warhol: Do you know how many listens it has?

SugarPlum: It just hit 1,000 two weeks ago. And “Maybe, Baby” has only been up a week and it’s already at 100.

matthew warhol: Tell me about “Maybe, Baby.” I listened to it on the way here and it has a different sound. Were you wanting to make something different?

SugarPlum: After I came out with “Clover Pt.2” with EMRLDTRACE, I got a feel with a different vibe. Then Andre Thomas — who is an amazing, amazing musician and producer — reached out to me and wanted to work together. All of the music on “Maybe” is by him.

matthew warhol: So was it already done and you came in and added melodies to it?

SugarPlum: Sort of. He sent me a little snippet of it and thought I would like it. I loved it.

matthew warhol: Did you tweak it together?

SugarPlum: Yeah, I went to Miami to see him. I’m actually going this weekend again. It was all a very good feeling. We would do things in one take. We’re like two puzzle pieces and musically, we fit perfectly.

SugarPlum Orlando music

matthew warhol: Is he producing more on the EP?

SugarPlum: Yeah, the EP is all me and him.

matthew warhol: So is “All The Time” going to be on it?

SugarPlum: “All The Time” will be a bonus song. I think the EP has a different vibe — “Clover” will be on the EP. But “All The Time” and an interlude I wrote on the ukulele are going to be the bonus tracks. Because they’re more, more …

matthew warhol: You want the EP to have its own sound?

SugarPlum: Yeah.

matthew warhol: So is it going to be more synth-based with more beat production behind it?

SugarPlum: There’s definitely still going to be guitar incorporated in the EP, but we have a more synth sound.

matthew warhol: How many songs?

SugarPlum: Five songs and we’ll all have the two bonus songs.

matthew warhol: Does it have a name yet?

SugarPlum: NO! I can’t come up with a frickin’ name. I’m seeing Andre this weekend and we’re like, “We have to get a name!” At the same time, I was bugging my friends like, “Do people name their EPs, or is it self-titled?”

matthew warhol: I mean it could be SugarPlum EP.

SugarPlum: I though the same thing with the interlude I wrote. I was like, should I just have it as “Interlude?”

matthew warhol: I think it can be either one. It can also be like … “[something] Interlude.”

SugarPlum: I had a name for the interlude, but it’s so long.

SugarPlum Orlando music

matthew warhol: What was the name?

SugarPlum: So when I recorded the interlude, it was on Christmas Day and I was eating Japanese food. So we just named it “Japanese Food on Christmas Day.” Everyone was like, “It has nothing to do with the song.” And I was like, “But it’s true!!”

matthew warhol: So the EP comes out … ?

SugarPlum: It should be early February. I’m going to be releasing it before the show on the 10th.

matthew warhol: Now the previous show at Will’s Pub, that your first show?

SugarPlum: Will’s was my first show. And it went surprisingly well.

matthew warhol: No, that was an amazing show. And so many people came out.

SugarPlum: Yeah everyone was so amazing. Zoya. Tiger Fawn was amazing. I remember smoking with Tiger Fawn before I went on, and I was like, “This is my first show! I’m so nervous.” And she was like, “MY FIRST SHOW WAS HERE!”

matthew warhol: And you had never performed on a stage before?

SugarPlum: Never, ever, ever, ever. I don’t think I had even played for most of my friends.

matthew warhol: How did it compare to what you thought going into it?

SugarPlum: I remember posting “All The Time” and thinking that I would be so happy if 10 people listened to this. I remembering looking into the crowd and hearing people sing along and it a different kind of feeling. To hear people singing along to my first song ever.

SugarPlum Orlando music

Discovering the Real Orlando: An Outline of its Up-And-Coming Music Scene

Orlando is generally known as a sunny town dominated by Mickey Mouse and all the other notable fantasy characters the legendary theme park brings. It’s a magical place where people – especially families – go to embrace imagination and somewhat forget reality for a while. From Denny’s to McDonald’s, it’s also a city that highlights commercial success, giving everyone a significant taste of the American fast food philosophy.

Behind this tourist town façade, however, The City Beautiful carries the dishonor of lacking a culture found in swanky US counterparts like Miami, New York, and Los Angeles.

These abovementioned qualities – as they say – are just the tip of the iceberg in the “actual” Orlando. For us to truly discover its local culture, we have to delve deep into the heart of the city, a place where we’ll find real people making a name outside the typical limelight.

In a time when music is dominated by the likes of Drake and Kanye West, Ariana Grande and Beyoncé, competition for pop culture relevance is at an all time high. If or when done right, notes and lyrics mesh in such a way that they’re both easy on the ear and roll effortlessly off the tongue.

No one can blame anyone if they think music, regardless of genre and medium, should have the primary objective of capturing listeners from the get go. Pocketfruity published an article highlighting Andrew Schartmann’s book about Nintendo’s widely recognized in-game tunes. The piece claims how there’s always more than just a catchy beat, as – like in today’s pop songs – music has to balance the environment and the actual experience.

For these pop music icons, they represent the “greater” Orlando. But for homegrown up-and-comers like Charlie Rose, they embody the “real” heart, an area that shines a beacon of hope to all the dreamers in the industry. This is where we’ll discover the city and all its hidden glory.

Establishments such as Venue 578 are great spots where friends can hang out and listen to raw yet first-rate music. It’s also a place that gives rightful spotlights to the Charlie Roses of the city – and the world, in general. As a matter of fact, last December, the bar formerly known as Club Firestone hosted an event for local artists to showcase their supreme talents.

To say the Orlando music scene vibe is at its peak is an understatement. If we solely base it on thriving concert stages like Venue 578, then we can deem the local setting “hotter than ever.”

Slowly, we’re chipping away at the collective idea of the city, learning and showing everyone how it’s more than just the main Disneyland and the birthplace of Backstreet Boys. By presenting native acts like Charlie Rose plenty of Venue 578s, we’ll ultimately erase the infamous Orlando brand “there is no there, there” and become a legitimate music haven – regardless of mass popularity and genre.

just some songs

just some songs. (9/14/16)

If you look at my Soundcloud likes, you’ll see that I pretty much only listen to Central Florida artists. And way too often, I let all these really dope songs build up and up and up without reviewing them. Then, periodically, they all come out at once in a segment I call “just some songs.” Enjoy.

Kaiydo — “Fruit Punch”

Kaiydo has come out of nowhere to produce some of the brightest summertime bangers this year. The 19-year-old emcee has been heavily co-signed by huge blogs like Pigeons & Planes with “Fruit Punch” being his biggest hit to date. The instrumental feels like it was made poolside in Miami; Horns heat up the block and when the bass comes in, you’re done. Kaiydo is so confident that he could be spitting in a reclined position. You can’t have more than him because he’s got the summer.

Dog Island — “El Dorado”

Dave Hanson is best known as the quiet half of Slumberjack–his drumming serves as the foundation for partner Andrew Kelly to make a huge, emotional mess on. While touring with the duo, Dave showed me some demos of a solo project he was toiling over. As the man steps from behind the drums to the mic, he produces psychedelic slacker rock as Dog Island. “El Dorado” is the first on his five-song EP, Laniakea. Dave’s personality is all over this release, he sings gently (surrounded by oohs and ahhs), plays a happy acoustic guitar, and smiles through the entire thing.

valleyz — “The Morning” (feat. DVWEZ & Olukara)

Another perfect summer song, “The Morning” combines the angelic voice of DVWEZ, the cocky slur of CLE-to-NYC rapper Olukara, and the child-like wonder of a beat by valleyz. The sweet dinging sounds like they were made by Fisher-Price. It varies in speed depending on who’s over it, switching from light and playful for DVWEZ to a quick burst for Olukara’s bars. The conversation between the two is passionate and natural. These two need to get together again.

Rogerthomas — “Thas Wassup”

St. Peterburg is lucky to have multi-instrumentalist and producer Rogerthomas–can ORL borrow him? He combines the delicate plucking of nylon classical guitar strings with drum and bass beats to create a topographical map without words. “Thas Wassup” has peaks and valleys. One moment it’s full of ticks, synths, smooth bass, and the aforementioned guitar. The next, everything is stripped away and our artist starts again.

native feel — “dont need ur love.”

Allan Duncan is a man of many hats. He skates with the Bev Boys, makes weird, jazzy indie rock with Sailor Ripley, and DJs/produces as native feel. I’m not sure how he made “dont need ur love” or where its pieces come from, but the many rotating sounds over a glitchy D&B instrumental keeps me bobbin’. Who are these two verses by? Why does the song suddenly cut out? More questions than answers, as is this man’s forte.

Orlando Fringe Fest
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TVW & SIGT @ ORLANDO FRINGE FEST (photos)

Orlando Fringe Fest is an institution, the longest running US version of the culture festival. Last Wednesday, The Vinyl Warhol and Shows I Go To hosted the WPRK Outdoor Stage where five of our favorite Orlando acts showed the primarily theater and performance art fest the strength of Orlando music. My BFF Joel Cameron captured the magic. In order, the performances were: Gary Lazer Eyes, Greyson of Someday River, THE STATES, Zap Dragon & The Attack, and Pathos, Pathos. Enjoy.

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest


Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

Orlando Fringe Fest

We follow Orlando music. Follow us.

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TVW Presents: Friday the 13th 2016 (photos)

Maybe you knew we do shows. Maybe you went to this one. We had a ball at Spacebar on The Lord’s favorite day. The bands (in order) that played were: The Death Tremors, The Welzeins, Donkng, Harsh Radish, and Slumberjack. Enjoy.

Our next event is at Orlando Fringe Fest and is completely free.

Photography by Sierra Reese.

The Death Tremors (5 of 7)

The Death Tremors (3 of 7)

The Death Tremors (1 of 7)

The Death Tremors (6 of 7)

The Death Tremors (7 of 7)

The Welzeins (4 of 4)

The Welzeins (2 of 4)

Donkng (1 of 5)

Donkng (5 of 5)

Donkng (2 of 5)

Slumberjack (4 of 10)

Slumberjack (8 of 10)

Slumberjack (7 of 10)

Slumberjack (9 of 10)

fk mt. & No. @ The Space Station

Last week, Columbia, SC punk bands fk mt. and No. ran through The Space Station on their short FL/GA tour. YouTube user Max Power captured quick glimpses of the chaos via a handheld video recording device. I’m beyond thrilled that The Space Station is becoming a go-to venue for local and touring acts. If you haven’t been to an event at the College Park screen printing shop /slash/ music venue /slash/ leather studio (?), then you should really just retire, because you’re way out of touch. Or, you save your reputation by getting your face smashed-in at a show in black hole that is The Space Station’s backroom. Your choice.  Enjoy.