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Harryson Thevenin/SR50: “Let’s See Where It Goes.”

How do you take pictures of someone who takes pictures? Harryson Thevenin has been bouncing around Orlando since 2011, shooting photos and video of anyone who will stand in front of his camera. He’s also worked heavily with local rap star TEDD.GIF and his record label, Retro Neon, to book and promote events that cross genres. Recently, Harryson combined his talents into SR50, an online magazine that covers all things Orlando through photo, video, and word.

After the initial idea of an interview, I ended up following him to three vastly different shows: An Ugly Orange rock show at local bike shop, Ace Metric Cycles, a rap show at art/party gallery Henao Contemporary Center and experimental noise duo Shania Pain’s EP Release at Uncle Lou’s. Enjoy.

Upcoming Appearances:

HARRYSON’S BIRTHDAY STAND-UP SHOW // APRIL 19 @ SANDWICH BAR

HARRYSON’S 26 BDAY PARTY // APRIL 19 @ SANDWICH BAR


The following is a night of culture, joints, & car talk.

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10:07 p.m.

matthew warhol: Tell me about what’s going on with SR50. What are you planning for it?

Harryson Thevenin: I have no idea yet. It’s random. Just kind of whatever I’m feeling at the time. I feel like the best approach to have with SR50 is to have like, almost no approach. Because if I get into to groove of things and have a formula, that could get old quick. If I have no expectations, I’m just like, “Yo, cool.” If it works, it works. If not, there’s another show tomorrow. It seems to be happening. There’s always a show. Mad different groups.

matthew warhol: You’re going to keep booking too?

Harryson Thevenin: Yeah, Sandwich Bar gave me Wednesdays so I can use that as a brain child, just for ideas for shows.

matthew warhol: How was Crock Pot at Henao?

Harryson Thevenin: Crock Pot was tight. It was our first big event. We had TEDD. We had The Left Field Theory.

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matthew warhol: There was a lot of people, right?

Harryson Thevenin: Yeah, Donny Blanks was the headliner. FIONA killed it outside. GRANT killed it outside.

matthew warhol: Do you think you’ll be booking more at the Henao?

Harryson Thevenin: Okay, I want to, but I worry that the Henao might get too oversaturated. Everyone that wanted to book a show that couldn’t for a while is booking Henao.

matthew warhol: What do you think… what’s the alternative though?

Harryson Thevenin: I don’t know.

matthew warhol: That’s why I’m really fascinated with a show happening at a bike shop.

Harryson Thevenin: Yeah, you gotta do something else. That’s why I loved Space Station. It’s like yeah, let’s go in this side room and set something up.

matthew warhol: So with SR50, is there absolutely no focus?

Harryson Thevenin: I guess just covering Orlando-based things, whatever.

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matthew warhol: You’re trying to do stuff other than music.

Harryson Thevenin: Yeah, for sure, for sure. Trying to do restaurants reviews. Literally anything.

matthew warhol: Are you going to write?

Harryson Thevenin: Yeah.

matthew warhol: Cool, I didn’t know you wrote too.

Harryson Thevenin: I can.

matthew warhol: Have you done it before?

Harryson Thevenin: No, but I could probably describe how something tastes. [laughs] I’m doing whatever. Whatever I can think of. There’s no motive. It’s just open format at this point. I don’t know what I’m going to do with it yet. I don’t want to have anything concrete because I don’t want to label it.

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11:59 p.m.

matthew warhol: Wait… Henao Center. Why are we going there?

Harryson Thevenin: There’s a rap show there. That’s the cool thing about this side of town, is you can skirt to everything. Yo, like the bike shop was tight.

matthew warhol: It was tight. Do you like, bounce around like this all the time? We’re going from the rock show to the rap show to a noise show.

Harryson Thevenin: Exactly.

matthew warhol: I appreciate that. I think that’s so cool.

Harryson Thevenin: I just fuck with them all. I can’t not go to one, you know what I mean?

matthew warhol: Something I’ve thought about in Orlando is that it’s too small to have separate scenes. That it needs one scene that’s all together and that’s how it’ll become a New York.

Harryson Thevenin: But I feel like in Orlando, people have the feeling that they have to separate from everyone, that they have to be “unique.” There’s so many micro-crews.

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matthew warhol: Do you think that’s a good thing or a bad thing?

Harryson Thevenin: I don’t know. I think it’s like a do-what-you-want thing. It’s cool, but at the same time is that really helping? Is it cool if only 10 people show up to your show because you only know 10 people? I don’t know. I think it’s cool to fuck with everybody and for everybody to fuck with you back. But, at the same time, to each their own.

matthew warhol: Is that why you started taking photos in the first place?

Harryson Thevenin: I think I started to take photos because I wanted to take photos. I was going to all these shows because I fucked with all of these people. I didn’t do it because I wanted to be a photographer. I did it because I wanted to shoot photos and I was at the shows already.

matthew warhol: So you didn’t take photos before then?

Harryson Thevenin: Not really.

matthew warhol: You had never had a camera?

Harryson Thevenin: Never. Yeah, it’s really weird.

matthew warhol: So what do you want to do?

Harryson Thevenin: I have no motive.

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matthew warhol: No, but where do you fall into everything?

Harryson Thevenin: Maybe I don’t. I guess I fall into the rap thing, but I’ll do an indie show. I’ll do a folk show. I don’t have a motive. I don’t have a direction. I think that’s the only difference between me and most people. I’ll do anything. I don’t care. It’s not drawn out. It’s not planned. I don’t know how to explain that.

matthew warhol: But people like it.

Harryson Thevenin: Yeah, people are bored. It’s like, even if I’m going to throw a show for no reason, it’s going to be a good show. I still thought about the lineup.

matthew warhol: Can I bring something up regarding that?

Harryson Thevenin: Yeah.

matthew warhol: This is something I thought. I remember I was in Savannah. And the day I came back, I came back to go to the TEDD, Shania Pain, GRANT, RV show because to me that was an amazing lineup.

Harryson Thevenin: But at the same time, the show did very poorly.

matthew warhol: Yeah, but that’s the thing… What do you take out of that?

Harryson Thevenin: I mean yeah, it did poorly but at the same time, there were so many people that wanted to go to the show that couldn’t go because they weren’t 21. So I had to put them on the guest list to get them in. What am I going to do, turn them down? No. I don’t care. I’ll put you on the guest list. You know what I mean?

matthew warhol: If it’s a local show. They’re not going to keep other people out.

Harryson Thevenin: But they try to act like that. It’s like, I announced my birthday party and someone from The Geek Easy said I could do my party for 18+. It’s like, “Well, we’re having a midnight special and lighting like 15 joints. Is The Geek Easy going to be cool with that?”

matthew warhol: And Sandwich Bar is cool with that?

Harryson Thevenin: I mean, they’re not “cool with it.” But Uncle Lou’s wasn’t “cool with it” last year. The next three times I went there the bartender was like, “Those were the best sales I ever had.” Don’t talk. Get your money. I guess my rational is weird.

matthew warhol: No, it’s like, “You provide the space. I’ll do everything else.”

Harryson Thevenin: Exactly, what is the problem?

matthew warhol: Yo, I’ve never been to the Henao. It’s going to be lit.

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1:09 a.m.

matthew warhol: Another one. Yo, how do you feel about turning 26?

Harryson Thevenin: It sucks just like getting older, ya know? The ideas are getting younger, but I’m getting older. It’s fine. I’m turning 26, but I’m like doing the same shit as I was when I turned 22. Where does the progression happen?

matthew warhol: How has the last year been? Do you think you’ve grown?

Harryson Thevenin: I mean, the whole event thing hasn’t grown, you know? The whole event situation for underground Orlando music is kinda not cool right now.

matthew warhol: Was it cool?

Harryson Thevenin: When Spacebar and The Space were open at the same time, it was very cool. You had options. You take whatever you can get at this point. You know what I mean?

matthew warhol: I agree.

Harryson Thevenin: It hasn’t been as cool ever since. Now, everyone books at the same place. It’s the same thing over and over and over. What’s getting done?

matthew warhol: Something that that made me think of is what Harry said to me when I asked him something similar. I was like, “What do you think it’ll take to make Orlando successful?” And he said that someone with a lot of money needs to come in and support people and build stuff. I’m curious as to what you think.

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Harryson Thevenin: I’ll say that we need some money, not even a lot of money. And they need to open something nearby where something is happening.

matthew warhol: A venue?

Harryson Thevenin: A venue where you can charge cover and have a good sound system and have ideas that can sprout from there. That is the immediate solution that I can think of.

matthew warhol: Wouldn’t that become oversaturated at some point too?

Harryson Thevenin: Maybe, but at the same time you have one more place, you know? If you charge $5 cover it’s a lot to break even if you have to pay the venue $200. There’s no fun in that. You have to do so much to just break even. You’re just helping them out at that point. You’re not helping yourself.

matthew warhol: And is that why you wanted to start SR50, to help the little guy?

Harryson Thevenin: I don’t mean to piggyback on the Harry interview but what he said in it is true, do it yourself. If no one is going to do it, I’m going to do it myself because that’s the only way I can see things done. I’ve done so many successful events and Orlando Weekly has never covered a single one. TEDD’s mixtape release was the littest event that happened the month it stopped doing events and there was no media coverage. I was like, “Where is the Orlando Weekly for something like this? I guess I’ll do it myself.”

matthew warhol: It needs to be covered. What is your goal?

Harryson Thevenin: I don’t have a goal.

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matthew warhol: But like, in your own life? Having nothing to do with what you’re doing now.

Harryson Thevenin: I don’t know if I have any goals. I think I’ll just do anything. Like cool, I can get a nice full-time job and not have to worry about money, but where’s the fun in that? I’m just working at that point, making sure I have security. I’d rather just be broke amongst my people, doing shitty events at small venues, making sure that people are accounted for because no one else is going to speak for them. That’s where SR50 steps in. We’ll cover it. It’s like what John Morgan said, we’re “For The People.” Because like, there’s no money in this. There’s no monetary gain. There’s no long-term goal because you’re not going to make any money long term. You’re just helping out the little man, which is fine.

matthew warhol: Do you want to stay here? If it launched you, would you want to stay here or leave?

Harryson Thevenin: I mean I guess I would want to stay here. At the same time, if I leave there’s going to be nothing else. There’s not going to be another person like me. There’s not going to be another person like Harry. If we both leave at the same time, the city is pretty much doomed — which happened before with the indie rock community. Remember Orange You Glad? Remember Total Bummer? Remember when everyone left?

matthew warhol: I don’t.

Harryson Thevenin: What’s left? Welzeins. Someday River. Everyone left. It’s like, we’re going to go to Shania Pain’s EP release at Uncle Lou’s… I don’t know, you do what you can with what you have.

matthew warhol: I don’t know why. I have hope for it. I see it fitting together and working.

Harryson Thevenin: I got hope, but at the same time, I’ve been in the scene since 2011. And I’ve seen the peak of it and I’ve seen the bottom. And we’re in-between, but how good is that? We’re super limited on venues and we’re going to oversaturate the one venue that we have that’s halfway across town. I’m down with it though. I’ll do whatever you guys want to do. I’ll ride the wave. I don’t know. I really don’t. For the time being, let’s get drunk. Let’s hang out. Let’s see where it goes.

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Swirlsss Interview Orlando music
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ART OR DIE: The Colorful World of Swirlsss

Swirlsss cares about Orlando more than most people. Even though she’s currently living in Kissimmee, she’s booking weekly events at Vinyl Arts Bar that feature local music, art, vendors, and more. Outside of that, she’s an incredibly talented painter whose swirls of color incorporate emotion and movement like those of the great expressionist painters. I wanted to meet up with this local person-about-town to talk all that shit and takes some pics of her and her art. Enjoy.

Upcoming Appearances:

Swirlsss hosts a night of music, art, vendors, and spoken word every Thursday at Vinyl Arts Bar.

Thursday, 4/6

Thursday, 4/20 (feat. Tiger Fawn)


matthew warhol: You were saying that, when you were younger, you weren’t really into art or music. Swirlsss: Not really. matthew warhol: Until you were 16, you said? When you took your first art class? Tell me about falling into it. Swirlsss: That shit fucking changed my life. Having an art class for the first time when I wasn’t in like Kindergarten. All I cared about was fucking school. So when I had a project that was art-based, I was like, “I’m going to go in on this art project.” It was a whole different portal that I never even knew was there. matthew warhol: Before that you hadn’t consumed much art, either? Swirlsss: I lost that whole side of me when I was focused on school. So it went literally went form one extreme to another extreme, only caring about school and wanting to be a perfect student to art. Art or die. [laughs] matthew warhol: And is that why you left Valencia? Swirlsss: Yeah. matthew warhol: What were you going to school for? Swirlsss: I majored in fine arts, but the first two semesters I was just taking prerequisites. The second semester I only took two classes, but I had a sociology class that was really interesting. Yo, my sociolgy teacher was wild. He’s a trip man. He was preaching like, “Fuck society. Fuck the norm. Don’t listen to society. Do what you want.” Every single day he would say this shit. And it really inspired me to fuck society. matthew warhol: That sounds like a real college moment. You have that one teacher that like, “Woah, this opens my eyes to the whole thing. This is what I want to do.” Swirlsss: Yeah, that shit was a trip because it inspired me to drop out. I didn’t take my final. Honestly, I was dumb because I didn’t take my final but I showed up to the last day of class. My teacher pulls me aside and was like, “Why didn’t you take your final.” And I was like, “I didn’t take my final because I’m dropping out.” And he’s like, “Why are you dropping out?” And I’m like, “Cuz society is telling me to go to school and I feel like I’m an artist. I want to focus on art.” And he was not havin’ it. matthew warhol: This was the same teacher? Swirlsss: The same teacher. He was not havin’ it. He was like, “Okay well, I know that you feel that way but I’m going to let you retake the final.” And I’m like, “I do not want to retake your final. I didn’t take it in the first place.” [laughs] “I don’t know why I showed up here. It’s the last day.” If I didn’t show up, I would have failed the class entirely. He would have withdrawn me from the class. matthew warhol: Did you pass the class? Swirlsss: I bullshitted the whole thing and got a “D.” I didn’t fail though. I don’t know if that’s better than failing. [laughs] matthew warhol: It definitely is. So you were saying that you wanted to focus on art. What is art for you? What did you quit school to focus on? Explain to me what all you do. Swirlsss: This shit, it comes in fuckin’ waves. It’s fuckin’ waves. My art career in the beginning wasn’t really an art career. I just wanted to make art. matthew warhol: What were you making? Swirlsss: At that point I was just painting. I would do more realistic things and I slowly got into abstract work. When I dropped out, I wanted to focus on abstract painting and showcasing my art. I think living in Kissimmee pushed me to do events which is what I’m focusing on now, coordinating events. Because there is nothing going on there at all. And I’m an artist living in Kissimmee and there’s no where to go. I’m either going to create that space to go or wait. So I tried to do events in Kissimmee and it guided me to do events in Orlando. And that’s what I focus on. matthew warhol: But your art right now is promoting and planning and connecting people. Cool. What do you like about it? Swirlsss: There’s a lot of people who don’t have a place to go and are intimidated to go up to anyone and ask to showcase their art. People are afraid to do that. But I knew a lot of those people, so I jus throw an event and ask them to come. So they don’t have to ask anyone. I’ll ask them. It’s nice to put people on and bring people together. I know a bunch of people from random places. matthew warhol: How I know of you is through Instagram. I feel like there are certain people in Orlando that are …. I’ll say local celebrities. Personalities that you see around. Those are the people I want to talk to because people know them already, but want to know more about them. And be there friend. And I think Instagram is a big part of that. You represent yourself as a person who is, uh … you’re creative even in the way you present yourself to other people. Swirlsss: Thanks. [laughs] I don’t know if I try to do that, but… matthew warhol: I think it’s just part of being an artist. Swirlsss: I’m glad that you feel that way because I love artists that do that, that live there life art as fuck. I love living art as fuck, enjoying everything as a form of art — eating food as a form of art, how you dress as a form of art, your aesthetic as a form of art. Even like captions on fucking Instagram, that’s art. You can use that. I try to write poetry on it sometimes. It’s all like a fucking form of art that you can express yourself through. matthew warhol: Was that something that also started later, like painting was? Swirlsss: Yeah, it was a slow process of growing into it. I felt like I was always … different! [laughs] I was always the weird quite girl that did her homework in the corner. Even though I was focused on school, I always dressed fucking different. Learning more about yourself pushes you to be more open in a way. I don’t know, you don’t really know too much about yourself. You’re holding everything in, but there’s so many different sides of you that you can experience. I feel like my life is experiencing those sides. Going through hair changes and style changes, all that shit is just learning different sides of you and just going through it. Sometimes you want to have long beautiful hair and dress girly as fuck. But then sometimes you’re just like, “nah, fuck it,” and cut it all off and be hardcore as fuck. matthew warhol: That’s why people do art in the first place, right? You’re hashing it out on a canvas, but you’re also figuring yourself out. But it’s cool, like you said, you want to take risks. Swirlsss: Yo, that’s crazy. Life is so fuckin’ art. matthew warhol: Isn’t it. We wouldn’t be having this conversation if it wasn’t for what we independently do and how it coincides together. Swirlsss: I feel like if everyone followed their passion, like bro, the world be so much fucking better. We would always be happy doing what we do and collaborating with people. matthew warhol: What’s the next thing you have going on? What are you working on now? Swirlsss: Um, honestly, just coordinating events. matthew warhol: Do you do stuff every Thursday at Vinyl Arts Bar? Swirlsss: That’s what my main focus is, doing events there. I’m focused on collaborating with people every Thursday because doing a weekly event is a lot. If I could choose to do an event, I would do it monthly and GO IN and make it more than an open mic night. matthew warhol: How has it been? Swirlsss: Honestly, it’s been great. People show up! You kinda see who is your crowd because there are consistant people that always come out. It’s become a family. We always know who’s going to be there and we always see new faces. It’s nice, you can actually see the community in people. matthew warhol: At your events you incorporate a lot of different mediums. You have live painting, music, spoken word, vendors. You’re bringing a lot of pieces of the community together and that’s really cool. Orlando isn’t big enough to have all these seperate things. It’s everybody supporting each other, coming out. Swirlsss: Yeah, yo, it’s great to see everybody doing it and supporting it. Like the fuck? That’s how you really grow a fuckin’ city. It’s one thing if one person is doing it, coordinating events. You can’t really grow a community that way because only a certain crowd will keep going. We’re all doing it. And if we all get together and do one big one, that’s some whole other shit. matthew warhol: So are you not currently painting? Swirlsss: I’m always painting. I’m always working on things that I never expose because I keep them in hiding. matthew warhol: *pointing to a stack of paintings against the wall* Are these them ? Swirlsss: Yeah, most of my shit is at my other place. My mom just brought these, bless her soul. These are a work in progress. This one I feel like it’s almost finished. matthew warhol: So like, what’s your set up when you’re painting? Swirlsss: I usually just lay on the fuckin’ ground. matthew warhol: And you just add a layer and let it dry, then do something else over it? Swirlsss: Yeah basically, I try to have a good first layer that is a good color that I want the whole piece to be. This one was different. I did a random layers over the whole thing. These two go together. matthew warhol: Diptych? Is that what’s it called when two paintings go together? Swirlsss: Sounds really sexual. Sounds like “dick.” I feel like these three (see photo) I was experimenting with. These are all new. I don’t have my older pieces. matthew warhol: In general when you paint, is it similar, hashing it out on the spot? Swirlsss: Yeah, I usually do the first layer on the ground. But I feel like — its crazy — I feel like each layer has layers within each other. A first layer is not even one layer because the first layer is just covering the canvas completely. And that takes so many layers. This I feel like doesn’t have a good first layer. matthew warhol: Because of all the white? Swirlsss: Yeah, I feel like this one is different. I don’t want to finish the whole thing. I just want to have a main focus. matthew warhol: What are you thinking about when you’re painting? Swirlsss: Honestly, I’m not really sure how it fuckin’ works in my brain. A lot of times I feel like I have something that I’m visualizing — but I don’t think I’m visualizing something — I’m visualizing a feeling. So when I’m looking at it I’m like, “is this pleasing to me right now? Is this the feeling that I want to express?” Sometimes I want it to feel brighter or darker. You can feel the colors of things. Like, “I need this to be a little more pink. It needs to have a little more pink feeling.” matthew warhol: Does that go from happiness to darker emotions. Swirlsss: Yeah, I feel like it does flow through emotions. I feel like the first layer is being like, “aw, fuck it!” I just pick colors that I like. matthew warhol: I love that. They’re beautiful. Swirlsss: I feel like I’m just trying to create portals that you can go into. matthew warhol: Yeah! Do you like going to museums? Swirlsss: Yeah. matthew warhol: Whenever I do that — in front of any painting, before really looking at it — I blur my eyes and take it in very broadly and see how it’s making me feel. Swirlsss: Yeah, I’m the same. When I go to museums, I step all the way back and see it from a distance. Then see it from one angle then go to the other. Then get extremely close to it. Really, I feel like I make abstract work. When I go to a gallery, that’s all I care to see. matthew warhol: Do you think you’re getting more abstract with your work? Swirlsss: It’s almost the same except now I have a vision. I know what I want to make and I’ve found the technique to make it. Before I didn’t know what I was doing. I was just feeling it. Now, I’m still feeling it but I figured out how I want to do shit. I wasn’t satisfied with my work before. It was almost there, but there was some things that weren’t working out. And I would honestly look up other abstract artists and see what they did. matthew warhol: Who did you pull from? Swirlsss: I don’t know any names. I would just look up, “famous abstract artists.” matthew warhol: On Google? Swirlsss: On YouTube. And I would just how they would paint and watch interviews. matthew warhol: That’s poetic. Swirlsss: A lot of female artists too. Most artists are male, but I didn’t want to be inspired by a male artist. I want a female artist who does abstract work to inspire me. They would get so spiritual with it. I’m like, “Damn!” They would just work with motion and color. So now I try to work with motion. matthew warhol: So you don’t show anybody this stuff? Swirlsss: I just don’t take pictures of them, and I don’t really showcase my work anywhere. I don’t know, I feel weird hitting people up. I feel like I’m still at that stage. And I don’t showcase any of my work at my events because I’m always putting other people on. Sometimes I’m like, “Damn, did I focus on putting other people on that I forgot to put myself on?”

matthew warhol: You were saying that, when you were younger, you weren’t really into art or music.

Swirlsss: Not really.

matthew warhol: Until you were 16, you said? When you took your first art class? Tell me about falling into it.

Swirlsss: That shit fucking changed my life. Having an art class for the first time when I wasn’t in like Kindergarten. All I cared about was fucking school. So when I had a project that was art-based, I was like, “I’m going to go in on this art project.” It was a whole different portal that I never even knew was there.

matthew warhol: Before that you hadn’t consumed much art, either?

Swirlsss: I lost that whole side of me when I was focused on school. So I literally went form one extreme to another extreme, only caring about school and wanting to be a perfect student to art. Art or die. [laughs]

matthew warhol: And is that why you left Valencia?

Swirlsss: Yeah.

Swirlsss Interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: What were you going to school for?

Swirlsss: I majored in fine arts, but the first two semesters I was just taking prerequisites. The second semester I only took two classes, but I had a sociology class that was really interesting. Yo, my sociology teacher was wild. He’s a trip man. He was preaching like, “Fuck society. Fuck the norm. Don’t listen to society. Do what you want.” Every single day he would say this shit. And it really inspired me to fuck society.

matthew warhol: That sounds like a real college moment. You have that one teacher that like, “Woah, this opens my eyes to the whole thing. This is what I want to do.”

Swirlsss: Yeah, that shit was a trip because it inspired me to drop out. I didn’t take my final. Honestly, I was dumb because I didn’t take my final but I showed up to the last day of class. My teacher pulls me aside and was like, “Why didn’t you take your final.” And I was like, “I didn’t take my final because I’m dropping out.” And he’s like, “Why are you dropping out?” And I’m like, “Cuz society is telling me to go to school and I feel like I’m an artist. I want to focus on art.” And he was not havin’ it.

matthew warhol: What is art for you? What did you quit school to focus on? Explain to me what all you do.

Swirlsss: This shit, it comes in fuckin’ waves. It’s fuckin’ waves. My art career, in the beginning, wasn’t really an art career. I just wanted to make art.

Swirlsss Interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: What were you making?

Swirlsss: At that point, I was just painting. I would do more realistic things and I slowly got into abstract work. When I dropped out, I wanted to focus on abstract painting and showcasing my art. I think living in Kissimmee pushed me to coordinate events which is what I’m focusing on now. Because there is nothing going on there at all. And I’m an artist living in Kissimmee and there’s nowhere to go. I’m either going to create that space to go or wait. So I tried to do events in Kissimmee and it guided me to do events in Orlando. And that’s what I focus on.

matthew warhol: Your art right now is promoting and planning and connecting people. Cool. What do you like about it?

Swirlsss: There’s a lot of people who don’t have a place to go and are intimidated to go up to anyone and ask to showcase their art. People are afraid to do that. But I knew a lot of those people. They don’t have to ask anyone. I’ll ask them. It’s nice to put people on and bring people together. I know a bunch of people from random places.

matthew warhol: I feel like there are certain people in Orlando that are …. I’ll say local celebrities, personalities that you see around. Those are the people I want to talk to because people know them already but want to know more about them and be there friend. And I think Instagram is a big part of that. You represent yourself as a person who is, uh… you’re creative even in the way you present yourself to other people.

Swirlsss: Thanks. [laughs] I don’t know if I try to do that, but…

Swirlsss Interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: I think it’s just part of being an artist.

Swirlsss: I’m glad that you feel that way because I love artists that do that, that live their life art as fuck. I love living art as fuck, enjoying everything as a form of art — eating food as a form of art, how you dress as a form of art, your aesthetic as a form of art. Even like captions on fucking Instagram — that’s art. You can use that. I try to write poetry on it sometimes. It’s all like a fucking form of art that you can express yourself through.

matthew warhol: Was that something that also started later, like the painting was?

Swirlsss: Yeah, it was a slow process of growing into it. I felt like I was always… different [laughs]. I was always the weird, quiet girl that did her homework in the corner. Even though I was focused on school, I always dressed fucking different. Learning more about yourself pushes you to be more open in a way. I don’t know, you don’t really know too much about yourself. You’re holding everything in, but there are so many different sides of you that you can experience. I feel like my life is experiencing those sides. Going through hair changes and style changes, all that shit is just learning different sides of you and just going through it. Sometimes you want to have long beautiful hair and dress girly as fuck. But then sometimes you’re just like, “nah, fuck it,” and cut it all off and be hardcore as fuck.

matthew warhol: That’s why people do art in the first place, right? You’re hashing it out on a canvas, but you’re also figuring yourself out. But it’s cool. Like you said, you want to take risks.

Swirlsss: Yo, that’s crazy. Life is so fuckin’ art.

matthew warhol: What’s the next thing you have going on? What are you working on now?

Swirlsss: Um, honestly, just coordinating events.

Swirlsss Interview Orlando music

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matthew warhol: Do you do stuff every Thursday at Vinyl Arts Bar?

Swirlsss: That’s what my main focus is, doing events there. I’m focused on collaborating with people every Thursday because doing a weekly event is a lot. If I could choose to do an event, I would do it monthly and GO IN and make it more than an open mic night.

matthew warhol: How has it been?

Swirlsss: Honestly, it’s been great. People show up! You kinda see who is your crowd because there are consistent people that always come out. It’s become a family. We always know who’s going to be there and we always see new faces. It’s nice, you can actually see the community in people.

matthew warhol: At your events, you incorporate a lot of different mediums. You have live painting, music, spoken word, vendors. You’re bringing a lot of pieces of the community together and that’s really cool. Orlando isn’t big enough to have all these separate things. It’s everybody supporting each other, coming out.

Swirlsss: Yeah, yo, it’s great to see everybody doing it and supporting it. Like the fuck? That’s how you really grow a fuckin’ city. It’s one thing if one person is doing it, coordinating events. You can’t really grow a community that way because only a certain crowd will keep going. We’re all doing it. And if we all get together and do one big one, that’s some whole other shit.

Swirlsss Interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: So are you not currently painting?

Swirlsss: I’m always painting. I’m always working on things that I never expose because I keep them in hiding.

matthew warhol: *pointing to a stack of paintings against the wall* Are those them?

Swirlsss: Yeah, most of my shit is at my other place. My mom just brought these, bless her soul. These are a work in progress. This one I feel like it’s almost finished.

matthew warhol: So like, what’s your set up when you’re painting?

Swirlsss: I usually just lay on the fuckin’ ground.

matthew warhol: And you just add a layer and let it dry, then do something else over it?

Swirlsss: Yeah basically, I try to have a good first layer that is a good color that I want the whole piece to be. This one was different. I did random layers over the whole thing. These two go together.

matthew warhol: In general when you paint, is it similar, hashing it out on the spot?

Swirlsss: I feel like — its crazy — I feel like each layer has layers within each other. A first layer is not even one layer because the first layer is just covering the canvas completely. And that takes so many layers. This one, I feel like doesn’t have a good first layer.

Swirlsss Interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: What are you thinking about when you’re painting?

Swirlsss: Honestly, I’m not really sure how it fuckin’ works in my brain. A lot of times I feel like I have something that I’m visualizing — but I don’t think I’m visualizing something — I’m visualizing a feeling. So when I’m looking at it I’m like, “is this pleasing to me right now? Is this the feeling that I want to express?” Sometimes I want it to feel brighter or darker. You can feel the colors of things. Like, “I need this to be a little more pink. It needs to have a little more pink feeling.”

matthew warhol: Does that go from happiness to darker emotions.

Swirlsss: Yeah, I feel like it does flow through emotions. I feel like the first layer is being like, “aw, fuck it!” I just pick colors that I like.

matthew warhol: I love that. They’re beautiful.

Swirlsss: I feel like I’m just trying to create portals that you can go into.

matthew warhol: Yeah! Do you like going to museums?

Swirlsss: Yeah.

matthew warhol: Whenever I do that — in front of any painting, before really looking at it — I blur my eyes and take it in very broadly and see how it’s making me feel.

Swirlsss: Yeah, I’m the same. When I go to museums, I step all the way back and see it from a distance. Then see it from one angle then go to the other. Then get extremely close to it. Really, I feel like I make abstract work. When I go to a gallery, that’s all I care to see.

matthew warhol: Do you think you’re getting more abstract with your work?

Swirlsss: It’s almost the same except now I have a vision. I know what I want to make and I’ve found the technique to make it. Before I didn’t know what I was doing. I was just feeling it. Now, I’m still feeling it but I figured out how I want to do shit. I wasn’t satisfied with my work before. It was almost there, but there were some things that weren’t working out. And I would honestly look up other abstract artists and see what they did.

matthew warhol: Who did you pull from?

Swirlsss: A lot of female artists. Most artists are male, but I didn’t want to be inspired by a male artist. I want a female artist who does abstract work to inspire me. They would get so spiritual with it. I’m like, “Damn!” They would just work with motion and color. So now I try to work with motion.

matthew warhol: So you don’t show anybody this stuff?

Swirlsss: I don’t know, I feel weird hitting people up. I feel like I’m still at that stage. And I don’t showcase any of my work at my events because I’m always putting other people on. Sometimes I’m like, “Damn, did I focus on putting other people on that I forgot to put myself on?”

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Swirlsss Interview Orlando music

?!? The Vinyl Warhol & Shows I Go To @ Orlando Fringe Fest ?!? | Wednesday, May 25

This year, Orlando Fringe Fest turns 25. I’m 22. Orlando’s most giving organizers have brought the Orlando music, theater, and art communities together since before I was born. And this year, Orlando music websites The Vinyl Warhol (us) and Shows I Go To (where I serve as Exec. Editor) are throwing a hugeee show on the FREE WPRK Outdoor Stage in Lochaven Park. Come out May 25 to see a stacked lineup (check the bands below) of some of our favorite Orlando musicians. We’ve tailored this show to perfectly fit the outdoor festival ethos, so be ready to grab a beer and soak in the Fringe. Music starts at 7 sharp. Enjoy.

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Gary Lazer Eyes (7:00–7:30)

If you recognize the song below, it’s because we premiered it a little less than a month ago. Gary Lazer Eyes are an Orlando quartet making moves into indie/alt rock after a long time in island and ska influenced music. This band features SIGT staff writer Sean Gray. He’s been an incredible addition to the staff, and my favorite work from him is his “Thank You…” series, where he expounds on his love for new releases by his favorite musicians like Chance the Rapper, Kendrick Lamar, and Alabama Shakes.

Greyson of Someday River (7:30–8:15)

I am so excited for Grey to play the Fringe Stage. If you’re at all into the Orlando music scene, you know about his indie pscyh three-piece Someday River–he serves as vocalist, guitar, and whatever you call a boy on a drum pad (drummer boy?). They’ve just released their debut EP Sleeping Sideways and have been hitting the Florida market hard with shows. If you haven’t seen Someday River before this is a perfect step into their music. If you have, come see the mystical aura of the band stripped down to its core voice. 

THE STATES (8:30–9:00)

Recently, THE STATES have relocated to Orlando–smart. In the last few months, they’ve been a part of 64 North’s free Monday series and in December played SIGT’s Paris Benefit Art Show. Their sound is light and punchy indie rock, a perfect soundtrack to play as the sun sets on a beautiful Fringe day. SIGT founder Mitchel described them as “all the good parts of Mumford & Sons,” but I’d like to clarify that they’re about X 1000 better than that.

Zap Dragon & The Attack (9:15–9:45)

Zap Dragon has been an elusive force in the Orlando scene for a quite some time now. They pop up and bills with punk bands, indie bands, I’ve even seen them play right before a bluegrass quintet. They’re fronted by “Diamond” David Zimlinghaus, a man with a mouth. “Sicko” was the first song I heard from the band, and Dave’s lyrics felt so angry and real that I could have sworn the song was written about me. “I got a problem with everything and everything’s got a problem with me.”

Pathos, Pathos (10:00–10:45)

Pathos, Pathos be on that OG TVW. I’ve covered these guys for what seems like forever now. They played our first ever show, and I’m beyond excited to see them close Fringe on Wednesday evening. I just saw the four cuties live for the sixth or seventh time and they played a bunch of new tracks off their upcoming Pet Names album. Peak my full review of the project’s first single, “Summer Nights.”

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