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Fat Night’s Dan Hanson on his ORL-to-CHI Transition

After I got off FaceTime with Dan Hanson–singer n’ guitar player for ORL-to-CHI soul/R&B band Fat Night–me n’ my ol’ friend continued to chat up n’ talk about his new life in Chicago. In this post interview dialogue, Dan told me a story that served as a great climax of his acclimation story, one that is laid out in the interview below. I wish it would’ve gotten captured, but I wanted to paraphrase the ending before you hear about the story that built up to it. EnJoY.

Dan went to an intimate 200ish person vinyl release show for Noname’s Telefone. It happened to be on top of a roof and had an open bar. He ended up talking to a local trombone player that happened to be Frank Ocean’s trombone player. When Noname first came onstage, she introduced her band and went back into the crowd to let them warm up the Chicago night and happened to start talking to Dan’s new friend. Then Dan happened to be singing along to the D’Angelo song the band was playing …ended up being pushed onstage by the 26-year-old rapper to finish the song.

Cover photo by Hannah Mae.

Upcoming Appearances

October 7: Fat Night at Ten10 Fest w/ Bask, Wet Nurse, Wolf-Face, & More.


Fat Night Interview Orlando Music Blog The Vinyl Warhol
Photo by John Keen

matthew warhol: Yo dude, how’ve you been?

Dan Hanson: I’m pretty good.

matthew warhola: How do you like Chicago?

Dan Hanson: Chicago is pretty good. I’ve been up here for 9 or 10 months now.

matthew warhol: I can’t believe it’s been that long!

Dan Hanson: Yeah, time has flown by, and city life is definitely a lot quicker, more fast paced than home.

matthew warhol: What do you think the hardest thing to adapt to has been?

Dan Hanson: We moved in December so it was winter time and even though it was a mild winter, there was a lot to get used to. You do a lot of walking in general, getting better sneakers or boots that hold up as much walking as you do is important.

matthew warhol: Damn.

Dan Hanson: Also, the climate is dryer up here so I had noticed within the first few months my nose was so dry, and it would get cracked. Not to get to involved with that, but it was to the point where I was using lotion on parts of my body that I’ve never had to use lotion before. It was getting real dry.

matthew warhol: I think we should have a 45 minute long conversation about lotion [laughs] and dry noses… What do you think the cultural differences are? Are you as involved as you were in Orlando.

Dan Hanson: Not yet, it’s a little bit more expensive up here and there’s so much more going on, so you have to really figure out what’s attractive to you. I would say that I haven’t gotten to the ideal place where I want to be here, just because it takes time to get involved and get to the point where you start noticing the same faces and realize your a part of something. It’s a lot more established. Chicago being one of the birth places of blues and jazz, it’s pretty well instilled in the live music here.

matthew warhol: You were the last Fat Night to move up there, right?

Dan Hanson: Nik, our drummer, was actually the last one but he came up right after me.

matthew warhol: Did you feel like you were starting over in Chicago?

Dan Hanson: Not really, just because we played up here a few times already and once we did get up here, we started making our way into lineups pretty quickly. It was just kind of another step, rather than starting over, a bigger step rather than figuring the whole thing out again. It’s just on a bigger scale.

matthew warhol: Are you finding it easier to get into your own niche—where as Orlando, with the smaller amount of musicians, are you finding yourself in a pocket more?

Dan Hanson: Um, I think it is very easy to find a niche here. I don’t know if we’re there yet. We’re still open minded with shows that come our way, but there have been a couple of pretty cool shows. One was with Durand Jones & The Indications who is on Colemine Records. We have a record out onColemine and they’ve been on the up and up. They brought a sold out show to a really cool venue up here called The Empty Bottle. And the same thing happened with another band on the label called The Dip. It’s been really having connections like that where if someone comes through, we can be like, “Hey, we’re here if you’re interested.” That seems to be a lot of what we’ve gotten into since we’ve been here as apposed to putting together lead slots for shows. That’s the one big difference I’d say. We’re kind of back to square one, opening up for bands before we can start laying down our own thing up here.

Fat Night Interview Orlando Music Blog The Vinyl Warhol
Photo by Lara Warman

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matthew warhol: I bet there’s something exciting about that though, especially since you’re not a new band. You kinda feel like you need to prove yourself, but you already have the chops as a band.

Dan Hanson: It’s been reassuring that we are heading in the right direction. We are toying around with some new sounds and getting a little more openminded towards what we’re doing.

matthew warhol: What are those new sounds?

Dan Hanson: About five months ago, we started on a new album, a full-length, and it’s the most songs we’ve had ready in a specific time where we’ve paired all the tunes together and it makes sense as a body of work. We’re starting to use a little more synth in some of the songs. We’re getting a little more comfortable with trying more for recording. We’re not afraid to do stuff that we wouldn’t be able to do live, like putting a bunch of vocal tracks on a song. We’re just focused on making a good recording.

matthew warhol: Do you think being in a new city has helped foster creativity?

Dan Hanson: I think so. The level of musicianship here is really diverse and really high caliber. You’ll find people in any genre killing it on any night of the week. It’s really cool to see how humble a lot of those people are too. Everyone’s just trying to make something good.

matthew warhol: Does the new album have a name yet?

Dan Hanson: It’s tentatively, but mostly likely, going to be called Live For Each Other, which is after the name of a song.

Fat Night Interview Orlando Music Blog The Vinyl Warhol

matthew warhol: Anything else you can divulge about the new music?

Dan Hanson: No release dates right now. We’re still wrapping out recording but I’d say we’re about 80% there. We did a huge chunk of the tracking while we were all in town. Colemine Records, who released one of our singles in the past, is going to be working with us on a release.

matthew warhol: Now, Gabe [vocals/keys] just moved to LA, right?

Dan Hanson: That’s correct, for about a month now.

matthew warhol: Part of me thinks that I would be frustrated with that, since you had all just gotten to Chicago. Does that mean anything different for the band?

Dan Hanson: It slows things down just a little bit, but everybody still has a pretty strong input on what’s going on. And it’s something that we’ve practically always been experiencing since this band started. We started—when it was just me, Nik, and Ted—Ted was in Tallahassee going to FSU. When he was in town, we’d just jam and make some music for fun. Then eventually, Ted was back in town, but Gave was going to school in North Carolina. When we could, we’d just make music for fun. Then Ted moved up to Chicago. And Gabe moved up to Chicago. We’re used to those kind of hurdles, but I think accepting that we can take as much time as we need is kind of comforting. It just feels like family. We all support what the others are doing. And we’re all just as interested in music.

matthew warhol: I imagine you have to have a pretty strong relationship to be able to do that.

Dan Hanson: Yeah, and we all go back… Gabe and Ted to go back as far as middle school and the rest of us since high school…

matthew warhol: Are you picking your nose on this webcam right now?

Dan Hanson: What’s that?

matthew warhol: Are you picking your nose on this webcam right now?

Dan Hanson: I might be. I kind of give no fucks when it comes to picking my nose. I think it’s a very natural thing to do. We come from apes, man.

matthew warhol: What do you usually do with the booger? Do you wipe? Flick them?

Dan Hanson: I mean… usually it’s just enough so if it’s itchy I’ll get it out of the way. If I am in a public place, I’ll try to find the most tactful way to expose of it.

matthew warhol: My thing is I just gotta get it off my finger as quickly as possible, caution to the wind. Getting into more of the music itself, there seems to be a lot of nostalgic sounds, reaching back into the past and pulling the music forward. How do you make sure it sounds new?

Dan Hanson: It’s barely conscious. A lot of the songwriting itself can be pretty in depth; we’ll get down to the nitty gritty detail-wise. But I don’t think there’s too much focus on making it sound a specific way. I think we’re just very aware of what we all like to sound like within the group. Everybody listens to what they like to listen to—we all really like old soul music—but a lot of it comes down to the way we’re playing it. It goes back into our relationship as a group. We understand where everyone is coming from when we’re making a song, trying to keep space for each other. I think that’s something indicative of those old soul bands, everyone gives each other enough space to let the song groove.

matthew warhol: With the vocals, specifically, how do you decide who’s going to sing what between you and Gabe?

Dan Hanson: Generally I or Gabe will come in with a formed song. We’ll play around with it and from there, we’ll come up with harmonies and bounce stuff off each other. Like, “I think you would sound good on this,” or “We should do a three part harmony here.” With “Honesty Man,” Ted wrote that song and he knew that he wanted Gabe to sing the lead on the verses and he wanted me singing the bridge and the chorus melodies. I think that goes back to us having a pretty good understanding with where everyone’s heads our at.

October 7: Fat Night at Ten10 Fest w/ Bask, Wet Nurse, Wolf-Face, & More.

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Fat Night Interview Orlando Music Blog The Vinyl Warhol

Hypoluxo Orlando band The Vinyl Warhol
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The Vinyl Warhol + Ugly Orange Present: Hypoluxo, Wild Pink & RV (photos)

If there was a consistent theme running through Spacebar on Saturday, October 15, I’d say it was symbiosis — i.e. a mutually beneficial relationship between different people or groups. Whether it was Brooklyn and Orlando, Ugly Orange and The Vinyl Warhol, friends who haven’t seen each other in months/years, or new people coming together over a common interest, there was a wave of togetherness that was nice to be a part of — pardon my sappiness. Thanks to everyone who came out. Good luck to Hypoluxo and Wild Pink on their respective tours. ORL, keep an eye out for RV. If you want more info on the bands look here. Yeah. Enjoy.

RV Orlando The Vinyl Warhol

RV Orlando The Vinyl Warhol

RV Orlando The Vinyl Warhol

RV Orlando The Vinyl Warhol

RV Orlando The Vinyl Warhol

RV Orlando The Vinyl Warhol

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Ugly Orange The Vinyl Warhol Spacebar

TVW + UO bring together BKLYN + ORL this Saturday at Spacebar

I can’t sing enough praise about Orlando bookers Ugly Orange. In less than a year, the trio of Nicole Dvorak, Hannah Fregger, and Kaley Honeycutt have built a brand that has elevated our creative community and the up-and-coming bands/musicians in it. Additionally, they’ve attracted touring acts from throughout the country to come play in Florida’s cultural hub. So when these ORL gems came to lil ol’ Warhol saying that we should do show together with two rising Brooklyn bands, I, I … I teared up a bit. The collaboration comes together this Saturday at Spacebar. Not only do you get three great bands, but everyone through the door will be gifted with an orange-themed mini zine. Enjoy.

Featured Image by Kaley Honeycutt.

Hypoluxo (BKLYN)

Did you get sand in my Joy Division? I’ve never been to the beaches in NYC, but I can only imagine that Hypoluxo sounds like an overcast, NYC beach day feels. This foursome just dropped their debut album If Language through Broken Circles, premiering on UK music blog GoldFlakePaint. The low, distressed voice of Samuel Cogen gives the release a personal feel; I lean in to hear his sadness over the beach gloom.

Wild Pink (BKLYN)

Listening to Wild Pink’s third EP 4 Songs — premiered last week on Stereogum — one gets a brief exploration through the band’s pallet. “4th of July” starts the album on a solemn, acoustic note, pointing in the same direction throughout. The next song starts with a little more vitality and builds with thumbing drums into a crashing, mid-tempo anthem. But by the end of “Forlim Chop” the Tiny Engines’s trio reach new levels of fuzz-fueled aggression.

RV (ORL)

In a very brief amount of time, RV built up quite the buzz in the Orlando music community. They’ve shared some great bills at Spacebar and Uncle Lou’s, and were both Ugly Orange and The Vinyl Warhol’s first pick to share the night with the bands above. I was convinced after hearing their impressive three-track demo, the only music RV has released up to this point. The electric drums paired with Mac DeMarco slacker guitar and poppy melodies are an enjoyable listen to anyone with post-hurricane blues.

RSVP 2 Ugly Orange X The Vinyl Warhol Present: Hypoluxo, Wild Pink & RV!
Good Graeff Good Job Go ep review

Good Graeff – ‘Good Job Go’ (ep review)

Good Job Go has me feelin’ some type of way. Once the EP had played through for the 6th or 7th time, I had to stop and inquire: when was the last time I heard something that simply put a smile on my face? When was the last time music made me experience unadulterated glee, for nothing but pure enjoyment.

Good Graeff masterfully crafted this release to keep anyone who hears it in absolute bliss. Bringing you back to that full moon on the beach, you feel the midsummer breeze blow back your hair as you take in the sparkling peaks of the Atlantic. Or maybe, it was the trip up to St. Auggie with the entire band in one car; the windows were down and the Florida sun illuminated every beautiful detail.

I digress. Let’s talk about those vocal runs, and how they ran away with my heart. I found myself treated to quick, precise melodies that maintain the thought and emotion of a talented artist, gracefully placed over dreamy cello and poppy bass.

Another delicious treat was lying just under the warm, fuzzy blanket the aforementioned melodies had knit: a floating cello. The instrument’s incorporation suggests a majestic melancholy over an otherwise upbeat album. This is most apparent on the final track on the album, “Unsung Heroes.” Unlike the former songs, this track abandons the rest of the album’s upbeat attitude, laying me to rest beside the sleepy cello.

You know what…
It’s time to press play again.

Good Graeff – ‘Good Job Go’ (ep review) by Graham Johnson

Boxing At The Zoo - 'BATZ' (ep review)

Boxing At The Zoo – ‘BATZ’ (ep review)

A few months after the release of Daydreamer by The Young Psychedelics, the band has been reduce to only two members. Count your lucky stars that Daniel Ramos isn’t one of them.

Alongside Chase Bauduin’s grand bass playing and fall-in-love-with- me vocals, Andrew Lesmes’s impactful drumming (already stoically seen in local psychedelic-revival band, The Detour), allows for Daniel’s return to the role of charismatic and energy-releasing lead guitarist for his band, Boxing At The Zoo. Fueled by captivating indie pop rock that mixes the emotional depth of early Modest Mouse, the catchy rhythm of Vampire Weekend debut, and the blissful vocals of The Head and the Heart, Boxing At The Zoo self-titled EP (BATZ) strikes a chord of harmony and progression for the Central Florida independent scene.

BATZ opens with “Wanderlust,” a playful tune that drags you in with its brilliant rhythm and friendly indie pop sound. Flowing into “Ms Molly,” Boxing At The Zoo demonstrates some playful riffs — their signature at this point. Remarkably, these two are the most straightforward tracks on the EP.

Leading into “Another Story (Feel So Low),” the dynamic sound of earlier tracks are simply and elegantly shifted into a bouche of elegant lyrics: “Another story/Just another chance to be proven wrong/Just another chance to move along.” Chase’s vocal duet with Daniel provides a milky mixture of sincerity and passion. “Gone,” a song drenched in lyrical depth and an attitude that strives for hopelessness, continues this trend with the lyrics, “No point in dragging distant memories/No, they won’t make me a better person.”

“Time Will Tell” drags you back into the quick and promising indie pop from “Wanderlust” and “Ms Molly.” BATZ closes with another passive-aggressive tune that is filled with as much elegance as any track on this EP: “If you simply tell me you miss me/ I can pretended to care.” Daniel gives us a wink with this solo near the end of this track and wraps us all completely up with: “Oh she loves me!/Yeah she loves me!/ And she knows it!”

Beautiful and drenched with a taste for irony, Boxing At The Zoo presents an enthrallment for independent rock in Central Florida. As Daniel continues to provoke us with realistically romantic lyrics, we can only wait around patiently, for more.

Boxing At The Zoo – ‘BATZ’ (ep review) by Andres “Andy” Andrade 

Dilly Dally - "Desire" Video
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Dilly Dally – “Desire” Video

My first affair with soft grunge babies [voice: affectionate], Dilly Dally, was their October 2014 track, “Green.” It’s a great song. check it out. They’ve released a few new tracks since then (also great), announced their debut full-length, Sore, and now, have appeared in their first music video for that album’s first single, “Desire.”

Chocolate legs are danglin’ from the skies, I get (Desire)
Milky waves are fallin’ from her eyes, I get (Desire)”

Although Dilly Dally are clear subscribers to the 90’s school of thought, dismissing them as off kilter 90’s revivalists is wicked and unfair. Because they’re more. Katie Monks growls like a reanimated Layne Staley whose jaw has rotten off. That allusion may be in poor taste, but try not to agree. Her refreshing aggression, along with a somber mood created by churning guitars and bass, makes Dilly Dally stand on their own.

If the question asked by this video is: ” What do the members of Dilly Dally ‘Desire?'” The answer is the following: skateboard, long strolls, looking at clouds, fresh linens, milk baths, and a sandwich (?). Unfortunately, what we desire can hurt us the most. Dilly Dally learns this lesson. Because sometimes that lovely stroll can lead to an egg being thrown at your head. Enjoy.

WAITRESS – “Ashes/Diamonds”

WAITRESS was brought to my attention by the impeccable Matt Kamm. Kamm, who moonlights as one-fourth of Me Chinese, is producing the four-piece’s forthcoming album. Over the past month, Patrick Walsh, the group’s head, has been releasing his own home recordings on band’s Soundcloud, with the latest being the new wave-y “Ashes/Diamonds.”

The bulk of the new song is its extended verses. An electronic hi-hat tambours above merging guitar and synth lines. The thin instrumentation moves at a creeping speed, with vocalist Walsh’s ghostly hums floating in the mix. He delivers vague lines that further the song’s mystique. In the breaks between verses, Walsh repeatedly apologizes for his friends and “last night.” His sincerity seems flat, given his tone. The words “drab” and “posh” keep coming to mind when I hear WAITRESS’ music. This music is above us, and I’m eager for more. It’s a cruel, cruel summer. Enjoy.

hear more from WAITRESS on the Orlando edition of “just some songs”