RV video premiere orlando

RV Captures Old Nostalgia in “So Easy” Video (premiere)

RV is the perfect package. They’ve got a hot sound that you know but doesn’t overtly bite from the bands of the now. And along with a genuinely entertaining live show, they look tyght as hell doing it. When you see the four of them up on stage banging out jangly rock tunes, you can’t help but want to be a part of their vibe — and I’m not sayin’ this because we all consistently complement each other on how we dress. To put it bluntly, their one of Orlando’s best young bands with grander potential than just about anyone.

In their debut music videothe band perfectly captures what I believe is their aura, nostalgia for a day at the beach that happened before you were born. Does that make sense? See, when I listen to RV, I feel like I’m in the grainy pieced-together world that is this new video. The songs aren’t inherently sad, but something about the way Justin’s voice lulls over the sparkling guitars gives me a sense of longing, but one that doesn’t entirely feel my own. It’s like I’m in the early-’60s, a time when our country still had its blinded innocence — as can be seen by the very alive JFK in the video. Overall, “So Easy” is a great commercial for their forthcoming album Anywhere, out this spring.

Tight Genes Orlando Interview
Image

Tight Genes: Sarcastically Screaming Through the Pain.

I’ve spoken to a lot of people about the state of Orlando punk. Although ORL classics like Wet Nurse and hardcore new-comers Flamethrower push the culture forward, the consensus is that it’s not quite as abundant as it once was — whether you agree with that or not, you have to admit that the loss of Vivian K., False Punk, GAG, Butterqueen, etc. were upsetting.

But there’s one group that absolutely will not stop. Since forming in 2011, Tight Genes has cycled through many different characters, always being a vehicle for Noah LaChance and Kayo Roguez. Tragically, two of those past members have since passed, one in a drug overdose and the other in a motorcycle accident. And throughout all this hardship, they’ve pushed forward releasing their latest seven-inch Prison Wallet in late February. I sat down at three of the four (Eddie appears via cellphone) punks in the current iteration of Tight Genes at the band’s animal-filled house. Enjoy.

Upcoming Appearances:

3/26 @ Uncle Lou’s w/ Sonic Graffiti & Stuyedeyed (The Vinyl Warhol Presents)


Tight Genes Orlando Interview

matthew warhol: How long have you guys been in this incarnation of the band?

Noah LaChance: The band has been together now for five years, quite a history. [Kayo] and I are both original members, but I started the band with my friend Owen. And uh, he was in and out of rehab and was in jail for a while, so it kind of stunted stuff. Before any of that happen, we released album that was put out by Goodbye Boozy, an Italian record label.

matthew warhol: What year was that?

Noah LaChance: 2011. So that was about six years ago.

[laughs]

Alexis Simon: Wow.

Noah LaChance: Then Pat joined the band. Owen ended up coming down and stayed with us for a while. He ended up passing away from a drug overdose. Then Pat continued the band with us; then unfortunately, he ended-up dying in a motorcycle accident.

Alexis Simon: That’s why I’m in the band. It’s kind of bittersweet.

Noah LaChance: Eddie had also been in the band for a while. He was our bassist. And after all this happened and I decided to continue the band — it was a tough decision, two people who are incredibly essential…

matthew warhol: That’s an incredibly hard thing to go through. I can’t imagine that.

Tight Genes Orlando Interview

Noah LaChance: But the first seven-inch we had were songs that I recorded and demoed myself for a while. I showed my friend Owen and he was like, “We need to make this a thing.” From that moment, I felt that this was my outlet from whatever I’m feeling. All the lyrics are really satirical. We have a lot of songs about movies. I have one about Predator, Big Trouble, Little China.

matthew warhol: How have they changed throughout the everything the band has gone through?

Noah LaChance: That happened a while ago … that was like two or three years ago?

Alexis Simon: Owen was like three years. Pat was like two years.

Noah LaChance: When we started we wrote slower, poppier stuff. It’s changed with Eddie on guitar and Alexis on bass.

matthew warhol: Was that in Orlando?

Noah LaChance: Yeah.

matthew warhol: Who else was coming up in that time?

Kayo Roguez: Golden Pelicans.

Noah LaChance: Wet Nurse was around in that time.

Alexis Simon: Odd Movers.

Noah LaChance: Pat had a band around that time called Sexcapades.

Tight Genes Orlando Interview

matthew warhol: That’s a lot of names. I guess this is a two part question because two things are going through my mind — because I’m stoned — so like, answer these in whatever order you want to, but how has Orlando punk changed and how has the music also changed, having gone through all that other stuff?

Noah LaChance: For the most part, even though it’s a punk scene at its core, it’s always been pretty open to a lot of things. I don’t know if you see this button. This is Todd. He’s a part of Tam Tam and The Sandwich Man — they were around back then.

Alexis Simon: They still play random shows.

Kayo Roguez: They’re  in hiding.

Noah LaChance: Thee Wilt Chamberlin has been around.

Kayo Roguez: I don’t know if they’re a band anymore.

matthew warhol: To me, False Punk was a huge loss. So that’s the thing I was thinking. There’s not as many as there used to be.

Noah LaChance: But even then, that was only like two years ago. And like five years ago, there was a good rise in popularity. Before this band started, Kayo and I were in a band called Lazy Boys — when he was like 16. Even if it was smaller, everyone had a band at the time. There was a lot more going on musically, and I feel like that’s way cooler, to have everyone actively pursuing music in some shape or form then even there being an active scene of a bunch of people. I’d rather everyone be playing music so you see everyone’s creative juices flowing. It was cool when there was a bunch more bands going on.

Tight Genes Orlando Interview

matthew warhol: You cherish it a little bit more. Alexis, when exactly did you join the band and was it already a little more sparse?

Alexis Simon: I don’t know, I guess I haven’t been around as much. When I moved to Orlando, I lived near UCF. And I liked punk music, but I never knew of anything going on. I think the first show I went to was a Lazy Boys show. But I was in a random goth band. As far as the scene goes, there’s always something whether it’s raw punk or grindcore or the opposite side of the spectrum. There’s always something happening and Orlando is accepting enough where you have a bunch of different genres mixing.

matthew warhol: I mean the show next Sunday, the bands are kind of like that. Stuyedeyed are a little more psychedelic. Sonic Graffiti are a little more rock n roll.

Alexis Simon: It’s cool that everyone is coming out. Not just musicians, people coming out to shows are open to listening to different stuff. Not everyone likes Tight Genes, but more people like them than I would expect, usually.

[laughs]

Noah LaChance: The thing I think makes Orlando unique, and is a part of why I’ve stayed here so long, is Uncle Lou’s.

Alexis Simon: I love Lou.

Noah LaChance: That guy has let me do so much shit in his bar. One time, I had someone jump on my back and ended up falling backwards and breaking a mirror, and he was cool with it. When I first started going to shows there, he’d always have his headphones on, be watching the sports game. He didn’t really pay attention. Now, you go and he knows everybody by name. He’s a character of Orlando. You got to love that. He’s let us do whatever we want. We’ve thrown Valentine’s Day shows …

Tight Genes Orlando Interview

matthew warhol: Was that the Tittie Thyme one?

Alexis Simon: We love Lou.

matthew warhol: By the way, what up zine community? Shout out Tittie Thyme. So then going to the other side of things, which is the question I asked before we divulged into that, how has the music changed too? Losing two people but continuing on, that has to change a person and that has to change the music.

Noah LaChance: Before we go into that I want to say one thing. One of the biggest losses, was The Space. It was so DIY. And we’d respect the place. Everyone kept it nice and didn’t steal anything. That was a big part of our band and what allowed us to connect to people from Jacksonville and Savannah. We were able to like, bring them down, have a keg, charge people five bucks, make 100 bucks to pay this band.

matthew warhol: And how were those shows?

Noah LaChance: Oh, they were awesome. It was like a house show.

Alexis Simon: Insane. It was so hot.

matthew warhol: And no one cared.

Alexis Simon: Carrying all the equipment up all those stairs.

Kayo Roguez: We could be there however late we wanted.

Tight Genes Orlando Interview

read our last interview

hear new Orlando music

Follow Tight Genes: Facebook / Instagram

Follow The Vinyl Warhol: Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

Noah LaChance: But to answer your question, and Kayo has a lot of input with this too, what is cool is that with Eddie being in the band, we’ve gone in a harder direction.

Kayo Roguez: We’ve always had a revolving door of people, in and out.

Noah LaChance: In the beginning, especially with my friend being in and out of rehab, a lot of songs were kind of stagnant. All together, we have three seven-inches so far. We have two on the way. One that is recorded and just needs to be mastered. And the other that we worked on just this weekend. Our latest seven-inch Prison Wallet …

Kayo Roguez: … is the first where I’ve played drums.

Alexis Simon: Even though you were the original drummer.

Noah LaChance: This is the first one with this lineup. And some of the songs are from previous lineups, but some our newer. “Bathroom Baby” is a poppier song that Eddie wrote. We’ve been able to flourish a lot more with this lineup, without everyone’s other interests, whatever they may be.

matthew warhol: It’s more focused?

Noah LaChance: Definitely is.

Alexis Simon: But the music is darker, especially after Pat passed.

Noah LaChance: There are a few songs that are a reference to them.

matthew warhol: Is it darker even outside of the lyrics?

Alexis Simon: I’d definitely say some of the songs are darker. But I definitely think that we’ve gotten more aggressive. I think the tone of the instruments has gotten more … I don’t know how to explain it.

Noah LaChance: But a lot of our lyrics are still satirical. Like I was saying, we have a song about Predator, the greatest piece of American cinema.

Tight Genes Orlando Interview

matthew warhol: Real quick, what are your favorite movies?

Noah LaChance: Predator. Big Trouble In Little China. Rambo. Besides that, I’m really into Wes Anderson. Of course, another one of my favorite is Mad Max.

Kayo Roguez: I like Alien.

matthew warhol: Do you guys like Alien Vs Predator. Did your friendship join on that movie?

Noah LaChance: Didn’t AVP end up cross-breeding?

Kayo Roguez: I actually did like the movie, though.

matthew warhol: Anyway, what are your favorite movies?

Alexis Simon: Mine are kind of different, I guess. My favorite movie is Magnolia. Anything that Paul Thomas Anderson directed. My first tattoo when I turned 18 references Magnolia.

Tight Genes Orlando Interview

matthew warhol: So how do movies make it into music?

Noah LaChance: Really, with action movies, they’re all satirical. They’re all phony. So it’s easy to write a cheesy song about cheesy material. It’s a time in cinema that will never be replicated.

matthew warhol: So like, I don’t know if this is getting too deep, but what’s satirical about your music?

Noah LaChance: Some of it. Our first seven-inch is called Cop Again. It was about turning tricks for heroin and going out. It was also a reference to a Mummies song because it was about stabbing a dude and taking his wallet behind a laundry mat. So the next song “Rats,” is about thinking rats are all throughout your house and that someone is recording you. It’s about paranoia, which, when you’re a heroin addict is something you feel.

Alexis Simon: I feel like he writes satirical songs about things that are really serious in his life to almost like, as a way to reflect on it that may not be as negative.

read our last interview

hear new local music

Follow Tight Genes: Facebook / Instagram

Follow The Vinyl Warhol: Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

Orlando Hannah Spector Art
Image

Moments, Moments, Momentum w/ Hannah Spector

Hannah Spector is a good kid who makes a bad grown-up. Her artwork is hypnotic, in no short part due to its playful colorful and shapes. It ignites flickers of memories that only appear before they hurl you into a dream.

(Note: This interview was recorded a few days after A Place Gallery, a DIY art venue by Time Waste Management, closed.)


Andy Andrade: I think the first time I became interested in your work when you held an exhibition titled  Moments, Moments, Momentum with Orlando-based artist Jacob Bailes at A Place Gallery.

Hannah Spector: Yeah I was really happy with that show, I love working with Jacob. His ethic is planned and methodical. When he approaches a work he’s precise and knows what he’s going to do, which I admire. When I do something, I don’t know when it’s done until it’s done. I make him loosen up and he makes me tighten up. We provide the pops of color that the other needs. We share the same aesthetics. He’s my favorite collaborator.

Andy Andrade: Are you from here?

Hannah Spector: Yes, but I’ve lived in DC for five years and some other places, France for eight months and Thailand for 3 months; by the Burmese border.

Orlando Hannah Spector Art

Andy Andrade: Was it a humanitarian effort?

Hannah Spector: Yeah, I was teaching art/music an English language to kids. Most of their parents were still in Burma, so they’d come here after school. It was a community center kind of deal.

Andy Andrade: How old were you when you did this?

Hannah Spector: I was a sophomore in college.

Andy Andrade: So you’re a yoga teacher, a musician, a poet, an artist, a humanitarian … what else am I missing here?

Hannah Spector: *pause* I think I’m pretty good at dancing.

Andy Andrade: Who inspired you to become an artist?

Hannah Spector: I think it was more of a slow building process. I was just good at art. I won the Winter Park Sidewalk Festival when I was in kindergarten. But I think it all started when I learned how to write. I would carry a little Hello Kitty notebook around my neck and only talk to people by writing what I was thinking or needed.

Hannah Spector Orlando Art

read our last interview

hear new local music

Follow Hannah Spector: Facebook / Instagram / Poetry Instagram

Follow The Vinyl Warhol: Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

Andy Andrade: How do you feel about the art scene in Orlando, given that we now have lost another DIY space?

Hannah Spector: It’s really sad. They had just made me a curator. There was a lot of people who would have helped out but just couldn’t.

Andy Andrade: That whole part of town is being heavily gentrified, what do you think the next move is for DIY spaces and culture in Orlando?

Hannah Spector: It’s going to just start being in everyone’s houses. That’s what I would do in DC, I would just throw gatherings in my apartment building. Bad things are happening in the Milk District too — landlords trying to get money left and right. There’s not a lot of funding down here for youth-oriented art anyway. The members of the art board, they fund particular artists … old established flamingo painters. It’s all about what can be consumed, what can they sell, and what people want in their houses. No one is going to buy the cage that Jacob Bailes and I created for Moments, Moments, Momentum. They don’t support the youth. Those board members, they’re stuck on this line of “Oh, as a kid you do face paints and then as you get older all of that is irrelevant. You paint landscapes and get rich.” Somewhere I got mad in that process. This is not why I’m making art. I don’t just want it to sit in people’s homes.  

Orlando Hannah Spector Art

Andy Andrade: When did you come to this conclusion?

Hannah Spector: I was meeting with a gallery’s board, and I kept meeting people that were in charge of their funding. It was a dinner and I started noticing how much they didn’t care about the artists, only about the wealth and profits that are coming from the work. I felt disturbed, kind of like in Fear and Loathing — when everyone was a lizard and laughing.

Andy Andrade: Do you usually represent yourself?

Hannah Spector: Yes. Always. So I can be unedited.   

Andy Andrade: What made you move back from DC?

Hannah Spector: I Just liked it better down here.

Andy Andrade: Why?

Hannah Spector: The people. They’re genuine; they care. They’re more genuinely creative. It’s a friendly competition, a community.

Andy Andrade: Everyone knows each other too. You can ask someone if they know so-and-so and they’re bound to say, “Oh, I write for that person. I paint with that person. I make music with that person.” 

Hannah Spector: I love that. I am happy to be here, in this moment. 

Andy Andrade: So what’s your current style? Preferred medium?

Hannah Spector: Painting and screen printing. They’re two different parts of my practice. Screen printing, minimalist color theory and focusing on shape and color, that’s it. I have a catalog of shapes that I’m going to stop using so I can be progressive. Screen printing is meticulous. You have to be virulent about your hands being clean, watching for the paint to not dry. Then painting, it’s chaos. Sitting with globs of paint … there’s still love for color theory, but it’s an amorphous color theory. It all depends on what medium I want to use in my next piece. That’s been my goal over the last four years, master the mediums through intense study. So when I have an idea, I can use the software, printmaking, woodcutting, music, whatever I need to get the idea out. I want fluidity. 

Andy Andrade: So if you had to pick, would you be a poet or a painter?

Hannah Spector: I really like the place I go with writing. If a voice asked me in the middle of the night, ”What must you do?” I would say, “I must write.” But it’s all part of the same feeling, I have to make things or I get upset.

read our last interview

hear new local music

Follow Hannah Spector: Facebook / Instagram / Poetry Instagram

Follow The Vinyl Warhol: Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

Hannah Spector Orlando Art

Transcendental Telecom Orlando Music Midnite J Premiere

Transcendental Telecom Dive Into R&B On “Midnite J” (premiere)

Growth fosters new ideas, and that’s a good thing. In music, change can add dimension to how you look at a band as artists. Transcendental Telecom is not a band that’s afraid to go outside their box. Released last year, their debut album showcased that in its varied, crunchy and shoegaze-inspired, guitars mixed with Spencer Tricker’s airy voice. Etherise made them stand out from other indie rock bands, and “Midnite J” does the same but in a whole new way.

One part Blood Orange, one part Tame Impala, the latest single takes advantage of synth in a way they’ve never come close to before. Spencer crafts a synth line that flashes over the whole song like a disco ball over speckled teens at an 80s prom. He encourages them to dance too, “All the people on the left, all the people on the right, come on.” The guitars are much more subtle, adding minute details in the distance. You can definitely tell Transcendental is the same band, though. Their sounds hold the same fluidity but in a much more sultry way. “Midnite J” is their version of a slow jam.

Transcendental Telecom’s plan is to release a few more singles and then have them all included on an album this year.

Follow Transcendental Telecom: Facebook / Instagram / Bandcamp

Follow The Vinyl Warhol: Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

read our last interview

You Blew It interview Orlando music
Image

Grown-Up Dude: You Blew It’s Tanner Jones On His Development as an Artist/Person

I’m speaking with You Blew It frontman Tanner Jones in Greenwood Cemetery on a warm Tuesday morning in February. This isn’t the first time we’ve met or even the first time we’ve had a long conversation together. No, that day was almost five years ago in a Subway parking lot across the street from the University of Central Florida. We had been in two conjoining car accidents — I collided with the guy in front of me, and he was hit by the girl in front of him — and struck up a conversation about our shared advertising/public relations major, music, and his band, who had just released their debut album Grow Up, Dude via Massachusetts emo-revivalists, Topshelf Records.

Present day, the two of us — sitting on a small bench feet away from the grave of Orlando pioneer Joseph Bumby — are evolved forms of the people who met that day. Tanner and lot released their third full-length Abendrot this past November and have tremendously expanded their fanbase with continuous touring, both as headliners and support for rock icons like Taking Back Sunday and Coheed and Cambria. (And I’m interviewing him for Orlando Weekly. Our Advertising Copywriting professor Joan McCain would be proud.) Enjoy. 

Upcoming Appearances:

3/11 @ Will’s Pub w/ All Get Out & Free Throw

3/12 @ Will’s Pub w/ All Get Out & Free Throw


You Blew It interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: I wanted to start with talking about how we met because I think that’s pretty interesting. That was four, five years ago? I was a Sophmore in college so that was like four years ago.

Tanner Jones (You Blew It): Yeah, because it was right when I started dating the girl I’m still dating.

matthew warhol: And we were in a car accident together, two conjoining car accidents. I hit someone, and then there was a gap, and someone hit you, right?

Tanner Jones: Yeah, yeah.

matthew warhol: We were talking because we were both into music. I don’t know if I’d started the blog at that point.

Tanner Jones: I don’t think so. You definitely didn’t mention it.

matthew warhol: But we were talking about You Blew It. I hadn’t heard of you at the time. But that was right after Grow Up, Dude came out. A lot has changed since then.

Tanner Jones: I remember being really h-angry. I was so close to going to that Subway.

You Blew It interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: I did get the Subway.

Tanner Jones: Did I too?

matthew warhol: I think we all did. It was almost like a movie where people are stranded on an island together, so they start to bond. No one was angry with each other.

Tanner Jones: Everyone was really nice.

matthew warhol: That was probably the best car accident I’ve ever been in.

[laughs]

matthew warhol: And we met so that was cool. Since then, You Blew It has gone to a completely different level. The second album came out. And personally, I thought the second album tightened everything from the first album. The production was better. The songwriting was better. But it was very much on the same path. Then going from there, a friend of mine had said something like, “I really like this new album, but I’m afraid that with the next one … if they don’t do something different, they’re going to disappear as a band.” Was that something that you were aware of?

Tanner Jones: Yeah, but it wasn’t so much a conscious conversation. You put out two records that sound mostly the same; then at that point, a certain boredom or type of anxiety starts to set in. We could have written that record four times, you know? And it would have been easy because it’s what we were used to. But at the time of writing Keep Doing What You’re Doing, it was hard and it was challenging. You want to keep challenging yourself. Naturally, to challenge yourself you want to go to new directions, through new creative processes. So yeah, that’s the long answer but in short, we knew we had to do something different.

You Blew It interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: What do you mean by challenging yourself? How did you do that, specifically?

Tanner Jones: One crutch we have as a band is that we like to use alternate tunings and time signatures. So if a part isn’t there yet, instead of changing it around and maybe putting it through a different instrument, we’ll just put it in 7/4 and it’ll be fine. Instead of doing that — this record we just put out — it was more of a struggle to try to do new things and to try to solve problems in different ways we haven’t before. For example, putting a guitar part on a vibraphone. Or maybe even scrapping a song altogether because it wasn’t up to par.

matthew warhol: And when you say that, do you mean that you were sinking back to the older music? Were you consciously trying to make it new? Because to me, it sounds like to push forward, you were pulling back a little bit. You guys were restraining yourselves from doing these really heavy songs.

Tanner Jones: Yeah, yeah for sure. Previously we were very maximalists. It was always three guitars playing different parts all at once. So yeah, that’s another big hurtle we had to get over, trying to scale the mountain with less equipment — if that makes sense. And it just ended up being really fun. It’s kind of one of those things where you hate doing it until you grasp how to do it the right way. Then it becomes rewarding.

You Blew It interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: On the new one … it’s weird because I was reading what you were saying in another interview. You were saying that was about a very difficult time in your life. Can you go into detail about that — as much as you want of course?

Tanner Jones: A lot of it was self-induced as I’m realizing now. Having the whole third record looming, it’s kind of like a big. There’s a lot of pressure … I guess that’s just an easy way to put it. So I kind of stopped taking care of myself, physically and mentally. I let things kind of bore into my skin and stay there. And then the door opened for a lot of mental issues and past problems that I had never solved. They all kind of came out at once. So the writing was both the therapy and the cause, you know? So yeah, I guess that’s pretty much the brunt of it. For example, the song “Greenwood,”  a lot of times to calm myself I’d come ride around here on my bike and take time to let everything sink in. As you know, it’s just quiet here. You can hear the birds chirping. There’s no one yelling, no on talking. It’s just a nice place to be alone. And that’s how that song came about, just coming hear and letting everything overtake. And those lyrics just came out.

read our last interview

hear new local music

Follow You Blew It: Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

Follow The Vinyl Warhol : Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

matthew warhol: So the songs are coming from the issues that you’re dealing with, but in this case, how you’re dealing with them. That’s interesting. Was there anything else inspired by the healing process?

Tanner Jones: Not necessarily in the same way “Greenwood” was written, but there’s a certain thing that a lot of the songs tap that’s dealing with mental issues and whether or not they’re self-induced. I’d say “Greenwood” is the unique one, in the way it was written. The other ones are just kind of … more confessional.

matthew warhol: You’re very much looking in on the entire record. Where like, the previous albums were definitely pushing out. When I listen to it, it just sounds like you’re getting older. Where things that bother you when you’re younger, you’re just pushing it onto other things and other people. Saying, “You’re the problem. You’re the problem. You’re the problem.”

Tanner Jones: Exactly. I’m sure you feel the same way where it’s like, you’re 18 to 22 and it’s like, “Aw, I hate my classes; it’s got to be because of my classmates. Look at these jocks and these weirdos! Fuck them!” But really it’s just, you’re looking at it from the wrong perspective. I guess getting older is gaining perspective.

matthew warhol: Was that a conscious thing in your writing?

Tanner Jones: It was one of those things where I realized it, but I wasn’t aware of it until after the record came out. After a record, I’ll listen to our stuff before it and see how it transitions into what we’re about to release. And I think that’s when I realized it. There’s definitely a perspective shift.

You Blew It interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: Do you think you’re happier?

Tanner Jones: Yeah, for sure. It’s a weird solace knowing that you’re the problem, ya know? Because then you can fix it. Where as, othertimes, putting blame on other people for things is just so unhealthy and terrorizing for the mind.

matthew warhol: That’s deep. [laughs] That’s a real one. So … you guys have been very supportive of Orlando. You haven’t strayed away from being an “Orlando band,” and so thank you for doing that. Because I feel like there have been other bands that have gotten big and ditched Orlando for LA …

Tanner Jones: … for bigger ponds.

matthew warhol: Did you ever think about doing moving?

Tanner Jones: No, we kind of always expected to stay here just because I don’t think that the place that you’re from should have that kind of hold, or that kind of baring, on your art. I feel like a lot of people assume that if they go to New York or LA that there are more opportunities and therefore, there are more chances to get bigger. When really, the big opportunity is that you’re doing it. And Orlando is an incredible place for culture, for people, for art. So just being here and having this base to build on just seemed like the perfect spot.

You Blew It interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: Do you feel embraced by Orlando?

Tanner Jones: Sometimes it’s hot and cold. But I feel like that’s kind of a good thing. Sometimes we feel like outsiders, but I think that’s just a product of where we are now. New artists come in and new people come in so the focus is going to be on them. We can’t expect to have the spotlight on us the entire time.

matthew warhol: What do you mean by hot and cold, specifically?

Tanner Jones: The Orlando Weekly one is a really good one. We weren’t in the “Here are bands that represent Orlando of 2016” list. And it’s completely reasonable to not be in there, since we were there before. But in the moment, that’s one of those things that’s like, “Oh man, I didn’t win the popularity contest this time.”

matthew warhol: But you have to think you’ve outgrown it to an extent, don’t you? Because there is no band in that list that is on the same level as you guys — not that that’s a slight to anyone.

Tanner Jones: I always hate to say that we have outgrown Orlando because I never want to outgrow Orlando. But sometimes, I think feeling like outsiders is a good thing because we’ll always strive to be better. It can only be good for us. It can only be good for our art. And it can only be good for the city. Because as soon as we get comfortable, why put out a Pulse EP or why thank Orlando or why even live here?

You Blew It interview Orlando music

matthew warhol: So like, talking about the Pulse EP, was that an immediate thing where you just knew that you had to help in some way?

Tanner Jones: It was very immediate. It happened … and I’m sure you woke up to helicopters too. I live in Delaney Park. Not only was it a global thing, but it was something happening around the corner. So we felt like we were in a really unique position where we had these masters that weren’t owned by anyone. And I think that anyone in our position would have done the same thing — and others did — but we were fortunate enough to have a bigger platform for people to see it and donate.

matthew warhol: It’s strange. You see the city continuing honoring it; you see the memorials and the murals, and to think it’s been close to a year.

Tanner Jones: The number one interview question I get asked in cities outside of here is “How did things change after Orlando?” And my answer never gets printed because I feel like it’s not what they want to hear. My answer is like, “Nothing changed.” Because before, I feel like Orlando was already very uplifting for the LGBTQA+ community and minorities, and that happened and that feeling just came out. Everyone showed it a little bit more. I didn’t feel like there was more love or more acceptance because that was already there. It was just televised. and I think that’s an incredible thing. It’s just not a great answer for people trying to write a really good piece.

matthew warhol: That’s definitely something we’ll include [laughs] that was a good answer.

read our last interview

hear new local music

Follow You Blew It: Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

Follow The Vinyl Warhol : Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

You Blew It interview Orlando music

Thrift House video premiere orlando music
Image

Thrift House – “Wake Up Little Suzie” (video premiere)

Thrift House is a band that pretty much anyone can enjoy. I’ve seen them just as comfortable in a room full of house-loving Body Talkers as they are at the classic blues rock room, Tanqueray’s. In my opinion, it’s the group’s young energy, — brought to music that your dad (maybe even your grandfather) would love — that gives them such a wide reach.

Case in point, the group’s cover of The Everly Brothers’ classic “Wake Up Little Susie.” Originally recorded in 1958, Thrift House modernizes the song by adding garage-style distortion a la The Black Keys. The vocals of Ian Cummings, Joseph Davoli, Robert John, and Kandace Marlon fuse into a smooth groove that pushes the huge chorus forward. To be honest, I thought Thrift House wrote this song; I’ve heard their demo and their originals stand up well. Let’s hope they see light soon. Peak their video below and check out some behind the scenes photos from that shoot. Enjoy.

Thrift House video premiere orlando music

Thrift House video premiere orlando music

Thrift House video premiere orlando music

Thrift House video premiere orlando music

Thrift House video premiere orlando music

Thrift House video premiere orlando music

Thrift House video premiere orlando music

Thrift House video premiere orlando music

Thrift House video premiere orlando music

Thrift House video premiere orlando music

Hello Happy Plants Interview Orlando
Image

Hello Happy Plants Makes Plants Cool Again

Anyone trying to turn a side hustle into a full-time job will find hope in Kelsey Ryder’s hard work. Starting off hawking plants in thrift store pots, her online store Hello Happy Plants has blossomed into a full-grown business where she sells a variety of handcrafted planters (air plants included) that take the shape of troll dolls, beer and soda cans, chip bags, cigarette boxes, and much, much more. She ships to customers and wholesalers all over the world, in big part due following she’s gained on her colorful, playful Instagram page. So I wanted to sit down with Orlando’s plant lady extraordinaire (and my close friend) to see how it call to be. Enjoy.


Hello Happy Plants Interview Orlando

matthew warhol: I know we’ve been talking about doing an interview for a long time. And I like, I think it’s not only because you do super cool stuff that’s really successful, but also because you and I have had really good conversations in the past.

Kelsey Ryder: Because you’re a Virgo, and I’m a Virgo Moon. Did you know that?

matthew warhol: No I didn’t know that.

Kelsey Ryder: The majority of what I am is Virgo.

matthew warhol: So what does that mean for us?

Kelsey Ryder: It’s because we are very like … you like things a certain way. I like things a certain way. We’re driven. Leo’s and Virgos get along because they are kind of alike when it comes to being critical, having an ego, and being set in their ways. But like, Leo’s need Virgo friends to show them how to be that way but with a little more tact and grace and a little less of an asshole vibe. Virgos need Leo friends to remind Virgos to let that opinion be heard and not take shit too serious. Virgos and Leo’s are bonafide hustlers.

matthew warhol: I’m so glad we were meant to be friends! So I wanted to start at our last real one-on-one, which was at the Always Nothing show like a year-and-a-half ago, because so much has changed since then. At that time, you had just gotten your job at Home Depot. I remember talking to you and everything was up in the air. You were like, “I want to make this my full-time job,” but you hadn’t yet. So do you feel better now? Are you more confident in what you’re doing?

Kelsey Ryder: Oh my God, I feel so much better. I have so much confidence in myself and Hello Happy Plants, but every day there is doubt. I literally wake up and walk 10 feet to my studio, and I paint all day long. It’s like, “Is this for real?” There’s definitely doubt in it, but I feel like I’m not supposed to be working for someone. I don’t ever mean to sound ungrateful, but I can’t have a boss.

Hello Happy Plants Interview Orlando

matthew warhol: When did you get to the point where you felt like you could leave your normal job?

Kelsey Ryder: I don’t know if I ever told you about Home Depot. They totally tricked me, man. I was supposed to go to the Garden Center. When you work at Home Depot they have you start as a door greeter. I think I was a door greeter at Home Depot for almost four months. And I realized the first month I was there, “They’re not switching me to the Garden Center. And even if they did, I don’t want to be here.” So I busted my ass. And it wasn’t really about the money. It was about the connections I needed to make. And when I made those connections, the money would come. So when I felt like I was at a certain place with what I was doing, I was out. They didn’t want me anymore either. They knew I hated it.

matthew warhol: So now take me through the process of making a new planter. Because I saw a video on Instagram where you go through it, and I know a lot goes into it. And how do you even find what you want to make?

Kelsey Ryder: I think I definitely started down a path of snack foods. It’s something I’ve always related to and it’s what my friends liked. Yeah, my first mold ever was … well, it was a terrible shark. But the second one was a little troll. And I kind of just thought, “Trolls are so hard to come by now days. Let’s try to make a mold.” It is silicone mold making. You pour wet silicone into a cast with whatever you want to make and let it harden. The process takes kind of a bit, but you can take anything and make a bunch of it. So I made the troll, and I was like, “I kinda want to make a can.” And I can do so much with a can. I’ve made some cool molds. I’ve made some wonky ass molds. I’ve made some molds that I thought everyone was going to love and everyone was going to want one, and they take me five hours to make.

Hello Happy Plants Interview Orlando

matthew warhol: What was one of those?

Kelsey Ryder: I had a lot of hope in the garbage bag. That shit never sells.

matthew warhol: What’s something that surprised you? That sold more than you thought?

Kelsey Ryder: The La Croix! Oh my God, it’s insane!

matthew warhol: You hit that right when it was becoming a thing.

Kelsey Ryder: Who knew? I literally made that for my grandma, because she hit me up one day like, “There isn’t a lot of things I would want in the house.” And I’m like, “Oh my God, she loves La Croix, that’s her drink.” I never knew anyone liked it before that. The first time I put one up, it sold and I got five messages immediately. “Do you have more?” And I’m like, “Hell yeah, I have more. Give me a day.” I sell a lot of those. Certain shops that I whole-sale with will buy 30 La Croix. It’s so strange, but I’m about it.

Hello Happy Plants Interview Orlando

matthew warhol: So I know, Instagram is the biggest place you’ve amassed your following, because you have almost 10,000 followers, right?

Kelsey Ryder: Let’s have a party soon!

matthew warhol: Yo, 10K. Because then it’ll turn to “10K,” right?

Kelsey Ryder: I’ll get a “K.”

matthew warhol: I know you’re looking forward to that.

Kelsey Ryder: Hell yeah, I am. I’m a fuckin’ Leo. I want 10,000 followers. I’m done feeling weird about it either; I want that.

matthew warhol: So how did you get into a groove with that? You don’t have to reveal all of your secrets …

Kelsey Ryder: No, I genuinely will give this advice to people who are looking for a way to broaden their horizons with customers. I’ve sent probably over $2,000 worth of stuff to people. Sometimes they post it. Sometimes they don’t. Two years ago, I made a list of every person that I was inspired by — in any way. And I wrote out a message. I would make it personal to why I loved them, but I sent a message out that was like, “I’m tryin’ to get my business boomin’. I can only imagine that your following is as cool as you are.” And that has gone over well. I think a lot people would think that that was begging. But I’m sending someone something I made special for them.

Hello Happy Plants Interview Orlando

read our last interview

hear new local music

Follow Hello Happy Plants: Facebook / Instagram

Follow The Vinyl Warhol : Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

matthew warhol: But on your Instagram, you’re not just posting pictures of your planters. You’re building scenes and doing stop-motion pictures do. So where did that come from? Because that’s what huge brands do, that’s what Taco Bell does.

Kelsey Ryder: I think what my planters are … Them being chips or something, it’s easier for me to be able to spin and make it be more realistic. I don’t know if you remember this, but it was one of my last days at Home Depot. I knew I was going to be leaving, and everyone there thought I was a freak. But one day I was like, “Fuck it. I’m going to make this video that I knew I wanted to make.” I brought the chip bag mold in with me, and I pretended that I was pressing all the buttons to get this planter out of a vending machine. And that video ended up being huge. I got a shit ton of followers, and so I was like, “Woah, I could totally run with this.” So I started doing it with the Slurpees planters at 7/11, having the people working there pretend like they’re scanning the planters.

matthew warhol: You’re treating it like if it were real. And people at 7/11 know you as that person. They love you! The people at Home Depot thought you were super weird, but I think you make these people’s day.

Kelsey Ryder: I don’t mind, but they all look at me like, “What am I doing right now?” I made this giant foam Slurpee cup — it was like three feet tall. And I asked the guy if when I started a small cup if he would tell me, “No, no, no, stop.” And he went around the back and brought me this humongous cup. Things like that they’re like, “Yeah, sure I’ll do it.” And they have no clue what I’m doing or what they’re doing, but they see how excited I am. I never worry about making a fool out of myself.

Hello Happy Plants Interview Orlando

matthew warhol: It’s just who you are, though. Hello Happy Plants is you. It’s your style, your personality.

Kelsey Ryder: I’m kind of a poseur now.

matthew warhol: Why?

Kelsey Ryder: Five out of the seven days in a week, I’m like no carbs, no sugar. So everything that I make, I don’t ingest. It’s my vice now.

matthew warhol: Do you ever get tired of looking at it?

Kelsey Ryder: Well, I don’t smoke cigarettes unless I’m really buzzed. So I’m like, “Can I get behind this?” But I see how happy things like snack foods make people. Maggie loves her chips. Bear loves his Red Hots at night. I watch that and I know they like it so …

matthew warhol: What do you think you’re tapping into with that?

Kelsey Ryder: It’s stories that people have with each other. Once a day, I have a message that comes along that’s like, “Oh my God, me and my best friend have gone and got Slurpees every Free Slurpee Day for years.” That’s cute to me. It is nostalgia for sure. I think the majority of what I sell is gifts for other people. And I’m all about that. I remember certain times of going to a certain gas station with friends and getting this candy, this chip, this beer. I think a lot of what I’ve made is drawn from those memories.

Hello Happy Plants Interview Orlando

matthew warhol: And now you’ve expanded into t-shirts.

Kelsey Ryder: I’m Jersey Shore-ing it up! Got my heat press.

matthew warhol: Do you have ideas of stuff you want to do in the future?

Kelsey Ryder: I want to build a skate park one day. I want to work with cement on a really big scale.

matthew warhol: Really?

Kelsey Ryder: I love cement. I think it’s really cool. Some of Bear’s friends build skateparks. I don’t skate at all, but I think there’s real beauty in the way cement forms and the way we can use cement. It’s beautiful, big structures.

matthew warhol: That’s so interesting to me, because you were talking about how you are the only one of your friends that only has their AA and all that, but you’ve made yourself into an industrial designer. The way you talk about materials is the way I hear my friend who is in school for that talk.

Kelsey Ryder: This circles back to working with your hands. But I started with the troll doll. I never knew you could make a mold of something with silicone. Who would think? But you can, and it is cool as shit. So you’re like, “What can I do with this? Can I use porcelain? Can I use resin?” But as for the future, I want to get things dialed in before things get bigger.

matthew warhol: Do you have a big goal?

Kelsey Ryder: I would kind of like to have my own shop one day. Somewhere cool and just have it be plants and my shirts and stuff. There’s a lot of really awesome stores I’m fortunate enough to be in, but I feel like … what’s a plant store that you know in Orlando? I feel like we need to make plants cool again. We need to bring them back. And that’s in no reference to “Make America Great Again.”

read our last interview

hear new local music

Follow Hello Happy Plants: Facebook / Instagram

Follow The Vinyl Warhol : Facebook / Instagram / Twitter

Hello Happy Plants Interview Orlando